Shotgun Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
I've heard him say that on the Outdoor Channel.

That guy talks 100 miles an hour, but I will say one thing for him. He's been there, done that, unlike most of the trainers out there. It makes a huge difference in what you teach and how you teach it.

I've always said that learning how to gunfight from someone who's never been in a gunfight or combat is like learning how to drive from someone who's never driven a car.

Edited to add:
Just recalled an incident with one of my nephew's liberal wife. She found out I was carrying and asked me what I was afraid of. I told her nothing that walks, crawls or flies.

OTOH, I am afraid of something that swims, the Great White Shark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
I grew up reading the likes of Bill Jordan, Elmer Keith, Jack Weaver, etc.

I was a HUGE revolver guy because of Jordan and my early qualifications with the FBI, but got into IPSC shooting in the early 80's. I was once in the top 1000 IPSC shooters in the US.

I can still handle a 45 ACP quite well, BUT arthritis can be a bitch so to speak. I also like the profile of a 380 and 9mm better in Concealed Carry.

5 years ago, I carried maybe about 30% of the time. Today, I look at my wardrobe to figure out HOW I can carry better. Probably 80% of the time.

Uncle Mike's Inside the pants holster with suspenders also works well. I had to give up a belt after having both hips replaced six years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not paranoid; just very very careful. :)
Luckily I live in a low crime town in a low crime state where carrying concealed or openly doesn't require any permits only that you be legal to own and use firearms in the first place.
I only carry a few places in town like late night runs to an ATM or grocery shopping. For an ATM visit I carry either my 38spl S&W model 10 revolver or my 45acp S&W model 4566 openly on my side. The theory being that an unarmed gimpy old fart looks like an easy target while an obviously armed gimpy old fart doesn't. So far so good. :cool:
In the winter I carry my 38spl S&W model 10 in a holster in a front pocket when shopping because a coat or hoody covers the small amount of grip sticking out and in the summer I carry a 22cal Beretta model 21A loose in a front pocket because it's quite small.
I gave the only 9mm pistol I had, a Ruger P89DC, to my SIL because he's one of the few people who liked the way it shot and felt in his hands. Though it was kind of large ( like a chunky 1911) it was lighter than it looked, very well balanced, easy to shoot, utterly reliable, and not ammo picky at all.
I also have progressing degenerative arthritis in both hands and wrists with a corresponding loss of strength and grip so as much as like shooting 45acp I find myself shooting 38spl more often.
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp.............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
I'm not paranoid; just very very careful. :)
Luckily I live in a low crime town in a low crime state where carrying concealed or openly doesn't require any permits only that you be legal to own and use firearms in the first place.
I only carry a few places in town like late night runs to an ATM or grocery shopping. For an ATM visit I carry either my 38spl S&W model 10 revolver or my 45acp S&W model 4566 openly on my side. The theory being that an unarmed gimpy old fart looks like an easy target while an obviously armed gimpy old fart doesn't. So far so good. :cool:
In the winter I carry my 38spl S&W model 10 in a holster in a front pocket when shopping because a coat or hoody covers the small amount of grip sticking out and in the summer I carry a 22cal Beretta model 21A loose in a front pocket because it's quite small.
I gave the only 9mm pistol I had, a Ruger P89DC, to my SIL because he's one of the few people who liked the way it shot and felt in his hands. Though it was kind of large ( like a chunky 1911) it was lighter than it looked, very well balanced, easy to shoot, utterly reliable, and not ammo picky at all.
I also have progressing degenerative arthritis in both hands and wrists with a corresponding loss of strength and grip so as much as like shooting 45acp I find myself shooting 38spl more often.
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp.............
Good for you for being proactive in your own protection. What follows is not a criticism in any way, but my own thoughts and observations.

No one really expects violent situations to occur - but they do, and usually without advance warning or your control.

If you have not read the book Sheep no More by Jonathan T. Gilliam, I highly recommend it. He is a former Navy Seal and FBI Agent. It gets political in places, but his thoughts on situational awareness and self-protection are well thought out and helpful.

I bought this book for my oldest daughter after she was attacked after attending a play in NYC. She lived there for six years and as many transplants are to the big city, she was somewhat blasé to the inherit dangers of living there...even in Manhattan. Native Texas girl who grew up in a small Galveston County town but had lived in Houston and Tempe for several years, which were not the same as NYC. Houston has turned terrible since the Blue Wave in 2020 and I will NOT travel into the city (I'm about 35 miles SW of there) without packing. As a footnote, my daughter was recruited for a job in Rochester and has now happily become a homeowner and resident there for a little over a year. Hallelujah!!

As to open carry...my opinion is don't do it. You might deter a bad guy, but if determined, you are going to be his first target without warning. I have never open carried except on our ranch in Central Texas while hunting or just general work on the place. IMHO, Concealed Carry is the only way to go. Have a holster that you have practiced with and is comfortable with whatever handgun that is concealable. I personally am carrying an S&W M&P 380 at the moment. I have also carried a custom 1911 in 45 ACP and a Beretta APX 9mm. They are much heavier and a little harder to conceal but do give more bang for the buck so to speak. I am satisfied with my 380 as I have put about 1500 rounds through it since the pandemic and it shoots well out to 20 yards which is much further than almost any self-defense situation. I also have a J-Frame S&W in 38 Special that shoots the 158 gr. SWC Hollow Point +P ammo out to 50 yds. with no problem. It is a pocket gun. I also have a Colt Mustang in 380 I have used as a pocket gun, but I prefer the revolver.

Another observation is your comment about late night trips to the ATM and grocery store. At our age, there is no reason that those activities should happen "late night"! Daytime trips to the ATM and curbside pickup at the grocery store should be the only time. :D I would still CC for any trip to the ATM.

Sorry I got long winded, but thought my message might be useful.

Good luck and all the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think situational awareness, or rather a lack of it, is a major contributing factor to many robberies and muggings. Watch people getting gas or coming and going from dwellings, stores, and parking areas you'll see most of them are completely ignoring their surrounding and focused on their phones as they fuel up or walk along which makes them perfect targets for a predator.
I don't usually visit an ATM at night but occasionally a night time visit is required. The reason I shop for groceries late at night is because I hate dealing with the commotion, crowds, and the inevitable screaming children always present during the day and I stay out of cities unless I absolutely have to go into or through one.
Wyoming did a survey some years ago and the results indicated that 90+% of the folks surveyed own firearms and 80+% of those surveyed carry, openly or concealed, at least part of the time and slightly more than half of that number carry, openly or concealed, all of the time so seeing people openly packing a handgun around here is not unusual.
It does surprise and freak some visitors out though. :)
As I said no permits are required to carry either way in Wyoming though many folks here have CCW permits so that they can legally carry concealed in states with reciprocating policies.
My grandson wants to move to Texas when he turns 21. The big draws for him are the warmer winters and the hot-rod and big truck culture. So having lived in the State several times I've related what I know of Texas and Texans which, other than the cities, is pretty positive.
He's considering locating outside of the major metro areas in a place like College Station or somewhere similar and he'll have his welding certificate and a couple years of experience by the time he's ready to move so finding a job shouldn't be a problem.
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp.................
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The longer I live the crazier our society becomes…

Nothing like a little gunpowder and lead!
When were you stationed at Schofield? I was part of a Marine security detachment at West Loch NAD in 71.
We went up to Schofield a couple times for machine gun training and when they needed more warm bodies for big parades.
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp............
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
I don't think 6 Shooter mentioned Schofield in this thread, perhaps another.

OTOH, I was stationed at Schofield with the 11th Infantry Brigade from 3/67 to 11/67

My current Avatar is the Lazy H, otherwise known as United States Army headquarters Hawaii. I was later stationed at Ft. Shafter, just above Honolulu and got discharged from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't think 6 Shooter mentioned Schofield in this thread, perhaps another.

OTOH, I was stationed at Schofield with the 11th Infantry Brigade from 3/67 to 11/67

My current Avatar is the Lazy H, otherwise known as United States Army headquarters Hawaii. I was later stationed at Ft. Shafter, just above Honolulu and got discharged from there.
I was just looking at his avatar and wondered. Because of my security clearances I was snagged to be part the Marine guard detachment at West Loch, it was an ammo and nuclear weapons storage base back then, when I came back from Vietnam at the end of 70 and stayed there until I was discharged in 71.
It wasn't exactly the Hawaii everybody envisions. There was sugarcane and scrub brush on two sides of the base and swamp on the other and the locals were pretty unfriendly. :)
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp..............
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
Yeah, I didn't look at his Avatar...stupid of me. 25th Division, Tropic Lightning. They proceeded out of Schofield in December of 1965 and the 11th Infantry Brigade took over until they too, proceeded to Vietnam. Later the 25th came back and is there to this day. I ran into a Captain and a Major with the 25th at the Kona Brewery in Kona, Hawaii (The Big Island) a few years back and asked if they were lost as they were on the wrong island. Turns out they were doing maneuvers of some sort.

I dated a Hawaiian girl for a while and found out why the locals were unfriendly. It had to do with the Massie incident.


Here's the infuriating part for the locals:
Territorial Governor Lawrence M. Judd commuted the 10-year sentences of the convicted killers to one hour, to be served in his office.

Also, the locals were mainly unfriendly to Navy and Marine personnel. They were fine with Army and AF with a few exceptions, but not many. I got along fine with them the whole time I was there, which is a large part of the reason I spend 2 weeks a year on the Big Island to this day. The Big Island is a whole different world from Oahu and Maui.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah, I didn't look at his Avatar...stupid of me. 25th Division, Tropic Lightning. They proceeded out of Schofield in December of 1965 and the 11th Infantry Brigade took over until they too, proceeded to Vietnam. Later the 25th came back and is there to this day. I ran into a Captain and a Major with the 25th at the Kona Brewery in Kona, Hawaii (The Big Island) a few years back and asked if they were lost as they were on the wrong island. Turns out they were doing maneuvers of some sort.

I dated a Hawaiian girl for a while and found out why the locals were unfriendly. It had to do with the Massie incident.


Also, the locals were mainly unfriendly to Navy and Marine personnel. They were fine with Army and AF with a few exceptions, but not many. I got along fine with them the whole time I was there, which is a large part of the reason I spend 2 weeks a year on the Big Island to this day. The Big Island is a whole different world from Oahu and Maui.
I lived in Kailua-Kona for a couple years where I was the service manager for the old Kona Harley dealership so I used to be pretty familiar with the Kona Brewery.
One of my techs, Charlie, was Hawaiian and could trace his ancestry back to the first Polynesians to come to the islands and one of his several times removed grandfathers had been an advisor to King Kamehameha the 1st.
The place was open 7 days a week but on Sunday it was just me and him in the service department so we'd put on KAPA radio and listen to Hawaiian music and talk story. He'd interpret Hawaiian songs, try to each me some Hawaiian :), tell me the Hawaiian side of Hawaiian history and stories handed down in his family, and I'd tell him about working as a Harley tech in Europe and other places.
Through him and another Hawaiian friend from Hilo I was introduced to other Hawaiians and accepted into their Ohanas which made my social life much different from most hoales.
Saddle Road is my second most favorite motorcycle road, hwy 141 on the Western Slope of Colorado is my all time favorite, though now it's been straightened and widened on the Hilo side. During the Ironman competition when Kailua-Kona gets pretty much shut down I'd ride over to Hilo side and party with the locals.
According to Charlie the Hawaiians' dislike of non islanders pretty much began with the arrival of Europeans whalers, grew with the arrival of American missionaries, and peaked when the American government, aided by many of the missionary's descendants, engineered the overthrow of the Hawaiian government and the theft of the islands. The Massie affair, like exiling and abandoning the lepers on Molokai, was just another grievance of a long list of grievances.
When the shop closed I moved back to the Mainland. Charlie died from meth addiction a few years after I left but I still keep in touch with my friend from Hilo and went back to the Big Island about 15 years ago for their wedding but only stayed a couple days and haven't been back since.
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp..............
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
I believe you're referring to the Hawaiians who call themselves "native Hawaiians". They were the ones I found whose dislike went way, way back. They're a pretty small minority, though, in my experience and the ones who realize there are no native Hawaiians, only immigrants and the descendants of immigrants kind of looked at it a different way.

At any rate, Kailua-Kona is a nice laid back drinking town with a fishing problem and I always look forward to being there each year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
"I believe you're referring to the Hawaiians who call themselves "native Hawaiians"

Yes, the "native Hawaiians", those descended from the first people to find and settle the islands. They were who I hung out with a lot. A few were pure blooded but most were of mixed ancestry and the pure bloods were all too aware that as a separate people they were rapidly disappearing.
Once they found out I was actually interested in real Hawaiian history and culture some would sit down and talk with me. The older people were the neatest to talk with.
One discussion that I had many times was how the hoales had overthrown their government, stolen the islands, and just as with the native peoples of the Mainland, forced the Hawaiians to give up their culture, social systems, language, even their gods, and turned their islands into something akin to a living Disneyland.
I told them that I and any thinking person had to completely agree that they got screwed big time but then I'd ask them, "What have you done about it since then?" and when they'd inevitably reply, "What do you mean?" I'd say, "Yes all of the wrongs you spoke of and more did happen but what have you done about it since then?" "Hawaii is run by politicians controlled by big money business interests through lawyers and the only way Hawaiians can ever gain back any control of the islands is to create their own lawyers, business people, and politicians to represent their interests but instead Hawaii has one of if not the highest school drop out rate of any US State so most Hawaiian people can only qualify for crappy service and low level entertainment jobs while the high paying and influential jobs go to off islanders; So what are you doing about it?"
Mostly I'd get answered with angry rebuttals but a few people would actually think about the question and answer intelligently and an even smaller number would tell me what they were doing to improve the situation for their people.
I've had basically the same discussion with Native people I know on the Mainland at a couple reservations.
"Yes you and your people got royally screwed over but what have you done about it since then?" The question can create some quite interesting discussions/arguments.
I could have been born on Oahu. My father joined the Navy at the tail end end of WWII and was stationed at Pearl Harbor for most of his 6 years. When he was about to be discharged he was offered a job as a service manager at a car dealership in Honolulu but my mother, who was waiting for him in Milwaukee, had seen an old movie where a volcano erupts on an island followed by a tsunami that wipes out what is left from the eruption and refused to live on any islands. :rolleyes:
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp...........
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
Yes, the first immigrants IIRC, came from the Marquesas and then quite a bit later, the second wave came from Tahiti or thereabouts.

But you're right about "what are you going to do about it". I've asked some the same question and got the same non answers as you did.

A "native Hawaiian" I know is married to the daughter of some old friends of ours. He/she live in Anchorage Alaska as he doesn't want to live on the Big Island in spite of being born and raised there and his family having significant acreage. I've spoken to him about it a few times and he prefers the life he has now.

I also spoke to the Hawaiians who worked in civilian jobs in Schofield and Ft. Shafter and generally speaking, got the same results and likewise with a girl who I got close to on Oahu, another native Hawaiian and her parents. They could also trace their lineage back through the early days but were very happy to be working on Army bases with good pay and benefits, so I guess they were content with the status quo.

When I was chief Engineer of an R&D section of Alcatel years ago, my chief Electronic Technician was a Hawaiian. He was born and raised on Oahu and was a beach boy (professional) for a number of years until he decided that job led nowhere so he saved up, got an AA degree in Electronics and became a great technician working for High Tech companies.

My parents never went to Hawaii, mainly because my Dad didn't want to fly a couple thousand miles over the ocean. He liked to fly, was a private pilot, but had zero faith in flying over water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Sorry bout my late reply…

I was stationed at Schofield barracks’s from 74-77: Company B, 1st of the 19th, 25th ID
People have always said I bet that was a tuff place to have been stationed, believe me as an 11B(grunt) they had our asses playing war games all over the islands, and the Kuhuku games I remember quite vividly.

As a soldier who never went into battle, my heart goes out to all who did, and especially to those who never returned! 🇺🇸
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
I thought Schofield was kind of a fun duty station. OTOH, I was 76Y30, Ordnance Supply, so I issued guns to you grunts and occasionally went out on war games with you but sat in my Jeep and listened to the radio (shortwave) to see how you guys were doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
My Father served from January 1941-December 1945. He was trained as a Medic in El Paso and shipped to Hawaii right after Pearl Harbor.

The GI Bill got him a College education, and family helped him obtain a Medical Degree. He worked for and later partnered with a Dr. he met in the South Pacific. He died in 1973 when I was just a teenager, and I never knew much about his service. I learned a lot from him about hunting, guns and reloading.

He did serve at least 2 1/2 years in Hawaii. Most of his records were lost in the army fire of 1973, Since he died that same year, I was never able to ask about his service. My bad.

Thanks to y'all who served. I was too young for VN and too old for anything else although I vaguely looked at the MC in around 1980 or so. Decided it wasn't for me.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top