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To me, these are still shotguns. All the previous replies seem to be concerned about dollar value. I think cleaning them up, trying to find parts, and just talking to other shooters about them would be fun. I've never parted with a gun, that I wasn't sorry I let it go - except a .41 Swiss.
 

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To me, these are still shotguns. All the previous replies seem to be concerned about dollar value. I think cleaning them up, trying to find parts, and just talking to other shooters about them would be fun. I've never parted with a gun, that I wasn't sorry I let it go - except a .41 Swiss.
All those guns will take lot of time and money and patience to get back into shooting condition. I’m with you. I would sure try and rebuild them all. I’m attaching a pic of a recent refurbish I did in a savage like one of your pics.
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To me, these are still shotguns. All the previous replies seem to be concerned about dollar value. I think cleaning them up, trying to find parts, and just talking to other shooters about them would be fun. I've never parted with a gun, that I wasn't sorry I let it go - except a .41 Swiss.
 

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Worthless junk.
Junk maybe, worthless not so much.
Good for parts or tomato stakes..............
Parts, yes, exactly.

The Stevens single shot is not worth the effort to resurrect, the two A% shotguns probably are.
Are both of the semi-automatics Browning's or in the one with the stock a Remington made American Browning?
Get some birchwood Casey Barricade and soak them down with it. I'd clean them up and the worst case is one functioning gun out of two
 

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Looks like a couple of Browning Auto 5's and a Stevens single barrel. I can't tell from the photo whether the single barrel is hammered or hammerless. The hammerless 219/220 is a good gun, I would fix it up for a shooter, if it is a hammered 94 parts are getting very pricey for what they are, but otherwise a good gun. The Browning Auto 5's are a classy shotgun and there are plenty of parts out there for most all variations. The Auto 5 seems to be made from relatively soft steels, the function is brisk with very robust parts, and they wear. You can kind of judge the lifespan of a certain shotgun design by the volume of parts available for a model, and there are one heck of a lot of parts out there for these. None of these shotguns are overly difficult to work on, so it seems you have some pleasant winter projects in store.
 

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The top A5 looks like a SBS and might not be legal. Good luck with those.
In my opinion, no, it isn't a Short Barreled Shotgun (SBS). Federal law states that a rifle must have at least a 16 inch barrel and a shotgun at least an 18 inch barrel and both including their stock must have an overall length of 28 inches. Just by looking at that barrel itself plus its length in relation to the loading tube and wooden fore end, it is obvious it is well over the 18 inches of legal length required for a shotgun barrel. So it is definitely not a SBS. It also appears to not be an Any Other Weapon (AOW) due to not having an overall length of 28 inches. It appears to be easily 28 inches or more in length. All it probably needs is a good buffing/polishing, a re-blue and a new buttstock, and possibly a replacement bolt spring housing silver soldered on, because the photo showing the grip tangs makes it look like it may have been broken off, but not totally sure, would need a closer up pic to be sure. It could be okay.

Worthless junk.
In my opinion, that's not accurate. Not only are there lots of good parts there, but as I said above, all the top old Auto 5 appears to need is a good buffing/polishing, a re-blue, a new buttstock and possibly a replacement bolt spring housing, because the photo showing the grip tangs makes it look like it may have been broken off, but not totally sure, it could be okay. We don't know the interior condition of any of the three shotgun's barrels, but being a smooth bore it's not as critical as rifling in a rifle barrel, so they are probably okay to use even if a bit pitted. It might be fine and not pitted.

All the Savage Stevens appears to need is a buffing/polishing, a re-blue and a new wooden fore end.

The bottom old Auto 5 appears to be completely intact with the possible exception of the wooden fore end unless it's in the tub with the barrel, and unlike the top old Auto 5, it has its butt stock. I can see its barrel in the plastic tub beneath the guns. I can see its barrel recoil spring, bronze compression ring and steel ring on the loading tube and held in place by the loading tube knurled cap. Put a fore end and the barrel back on and it would probably be shoot-able immediately. It probably just needs a buffing/polishing and lots of Remy gun oil sprayed inside it as do the other two also. But "Worthless Junk?", in my opinion definitely not.

I've restored equally various as bad condition handguns, rifles and shotguns to almost like new condition. For example this Browning designed, 1930's "Montgomery Wards model 35" also known by various names of "The Ranger", Model 30" and "Model 520" and several other names depending on what vendor it was made for. I bought it off gunbroker for $50.00. Strange that the gun shop didn't realize what a nice "take down" compact to store, all steel and wood, finely machined antique they had. I had to replace the never made for it and totally incorrect buttstock with a correct one from Boyds, grind the broken firing pin to two chisel points placed together that I mig welded, epoxy the thin metal tube that goes inside the fore end and goes OVER the loading tube, and buff/polish the entire gun on my three buffers. I did this back around 2017 if memory serves me. It shoots great, but since I have and like the antique Cutts compensators with both screw on chokes and adjustable chokes on various ones of my antique shotguns, I bought this antique shorter version of a Cutts comp known as the Savage Super Choke, that also has the quick twist adjustable choke like some of my other Cutts comp equipped antique shotguns have.

Here's a link to my old 2 page thread showing various posts I posted text and pics of the stages of my restoring my 1930's Browning Wards model 35 (Browning 520). It might be wise in the future to not be so negative and disparaging about something by calling it "worthless junk" without giving it further thought first. It would also help change people's opinion on that if they had done restorations theirself so they could spot a restorable firearm from one that was beyond restoration but was still good for parts. The truth is, unless every single part of it is rusted or broken so badly as to be useless, there is usually always some good usable parts left on a gun. Even a "piece of junk" (if in fact it is), usually has worth for parts. The gunshop that sold me this shotgun on gunbroker for $50.00 thought it was almost "a worthless piece of junk" also, obviously had no one with a discerning eye nor the ability to restore guns or else just didn't want to take the time to do so. What they thought was "worthless junk" is my restored shorter barrel (but legal) handy, compact, take down, jewel of an antique 12 gauge.


And here's a couple of pics I took of it this week both full length and showing the "take down' feature of this shotgun, along with the antique Savage Super Choke I bought for it and will be installing myself. Right now it still has the cut off barrel section in it on the Super Choke. Some of these were threaded onto a bushing silver soldered onto the barrel and secured from unscrewing from that bushing via set screws, and some were just silver soldered directly onto the barrel without a bushing. It appears mine is the latter, but I'll know for sure when I heat the rear of the comp body with my torch to liquify the silver solder and pull the cut barrel section out. Cut barrel section is the exact same diameter as my 12 gauge shotgun's barrel is, so it should silver solder on my barrel just fine.

I'll be re-bluing it before I attach the Savage Super Choke so they will match each other. Would like to keep the gun "in the white" but it just wouldn't look as good with a black comp on the end of the barrel and the rest of the gun in the white and just waxed. The comp and twist adjustable choke will make the gun much more versatile and enable me to use it for firing different patterns at various ranging even though the barrel itself is cut and is cylinder bore and about 19 inches in length. The BATFE measures a barrel by dropping a rod down the muzzle until it contacts the face of the bolt and then marks where the rod exits the barrel.

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In take down mode. Super easy to take down. I can do it in about 10 seconds.
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No plastic trigger guard nor other plastic parts, no stamped receiver walls, no alloy, no aluminum. Just good quality steel and wood. No manufacturer anymore would machine out a solid steel receiver and those receiver slots and matching barrel breach ones that slide together and come apart in just seconds. That's old school quality that would be too expensive for them to make today and they would have to charge so much that no one would buy it today. But you can pick up these old "sleepers" very cheap today because the new generation knows little to nothing about them and buys the new stuff they see advertised. In take down mode, you can literally carry it in your knapsack and no one would know. The antiques are better than the cost cutting, cheaply made new ones. Problem is, too few people know about them today. (But that's good for guys like me and keeps the prices down on used ones, and now I've got three of these "double hump" model 520 types).
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They call it the Savage Super Choke, but to me, it looks exactly like a shorter Cutts compensator which is perfect and goes along with the shorter but legal length barrel I have. The Savage has 16 gas expansion chamber slots while the Cutts comp has 24 (equal slots on bottoms as on tops). Otherwise they are almost identical in design. It would not surprise me if Savage had these made by Lyman who also made the Cutts compensators.
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