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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Somebody talked me into doing a no-no with one of my IZ_109s.. shooting clays. After a case of clays and about a hundred heavy 00 downrange, I decided to give in and buy the cheap bulk Wallyworld 2.75" target load. Expecting this stuff to not cycle properly as people claim with Saiga12s I orderd the CSS gas plug, puck, and reduced recoil spring. I took the kit (still in the box) and the cheap ammo to the range and as luck would have it, I was able to shoot the Wallyworld stuff with zero FTEs on the stock plug so I never installed the CSS upgade parts.

Question is:
1) I can shoot cheap Wallyammo on either setting of the stock plug (1 or 2). Plug was verified reseated fully and then position checked twice. Is there a problem with the gun?
2) Has Federal stepped up their game and made better target loads or is there a worse brand that I can test and try to create a FTE?
3) maybe there isn't any difference between the birdshot labeled Hi Brass and the ones not labeled as such?

Any input appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I've never had a problem with the cheap federal bulk packs. I have had trouble with the winchesters though. The aluminium would swell and then the extractor couldn't get it out of the chamber. And i think that is the biggest differance is the high brass won't expand as bad while the alluminium can which can cause the problem above.

And on second look were you shooting clays with 00???
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All I had on hand originally was heavy duty defense rounds and the buckshot was the most abundant. Trying to hit clays with expanding slugs is entertaining but beyond my skill. My concern is that I may be getting too much gas which equates to accelerated wear/tear on the moving internals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
All I had on hand originally was heavy duty defense rounds and the buckshot was the most abundant. Trying to hit clays with expanding slugs is entertaining but beyond my skill. My concern is that I may be getting too much gas which equates to accelerated wear/tear on the moving internals.
Your cheap shells are going to be a lot weaker then most buck shot. I shoot clays about once a month and go through a couple hundred of the cheap walmart stuff. There is no way i would do that with the buck shot. Not to mention all the holes in the pattern the clay could go through.
 

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Rogers Sporting Goods | Gear for the Serious Outdoor Enthusiasts at Rogers Sporting Goods - Hunting, Fishing, Camping - Ammo section, Target loads. (cheapest prices around, thank god I live 25 mins from them)

Generally for Skeet/Sporting clays you want #8 shot, 1oz to 1 1/8th oz. 2 3/4 dram to 3 1/2 dram loads.

2 3/4 drams run about 1145-1200FPS and the 3 1/2 drams run 1300-1350FPS (you'll notice a difference between them)

For trap, I like #7.5 shot, in 1 1/8 oz - 16-22yards, 1200fps works good, 22+ I move up to 1300-1350fps to compensate for the extra distance and maintain the same pellet energy.

I've never had issue with these loads running in an Auto-Chucker as long as it was clean and not over oiled.

I do not usually run auto guns @ the Shooting park, I'm an O/U guy.

NachO
 

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High Brass vs Low Brass

It used to be that High Brass on shotgun shells designated a more powerful shotgun shell; such as, waterfowl and turkey loads with 1 1/4 oz. or heavier shot loads. Low brass designated "field" loads; such as, what one would use for quail, squirrels, rabbits, which had 1 1/8 or less loads (12 gauge).

Such designations no longer hold up. Foreign companies target loads, whether made in loading station they have set up here in the USA or overseas, quite often have high brass; in fact, some companies; such as Fiocchi, Gamebore, Sellier & Bellot, Kemen, ArmUSA, Rio, etc. use high brass quite often to designate higher speed loads (1300 - 1400 fps) with less than 1 1/8 oz. shot. Mostly you find these at the sporting clays or bunker trap (ex-international trap) ranges where lighter 12 gauge loads - 7/8 or 1 oz - at higher speeds are coming popular, but these companies have been entering the hunting market recently. You will see the high brass in field loads, again designating the shot speed in excess of the standard 1200 fps.
 

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Buckshot at Shooting Ranges

I hope you didn't mean that you shot your #00 buckshot at a skeet, trap, or sporting clays range. By standard, throughout the USA, these ranges limit the maximum shot size to #7 1/2 (USA size) or #7 (Intn'l size). Legal safety zone for these type ranges is 330 - 350 yards (depending upon location), because maximum range for #7 1/2 shot is 290 yards (optimum angle with 25 knot following wind). The maximum range for #00 buckshot without wind is over 500 yards, which could put the shot into roadways or populated areas outside the range's normal safety zone.
 
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