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Can you use steel shot in a Remington 870 Express with a choke? For some reason I seem to remember hearing you should not do this.
 

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What choke? What year 870?

Generally speaking steel shot is not good in full choke barrels, unless other wise stated.
It will be stamped on the choke or the package the choke came in. My 870 came with a modified choke. I bought a full choke and either the package stated OK for steel shot and I believe the choke was too. Could be mistaken on the choke part. So it does matter on what choke you buy.
 

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This stuff has a track record of misfiring. sounds like the seller knew it and threw it in to sweatin the pot...and pass off a hot potato.
the problem area i believe is in their special reciepe to eliminate muzzle flash.
 

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This stuff has a track record of misfiring. sounds like the seller knew it and threw it in to sweatin the pot...and pass off a hot potato.
the problem area i believe is in their special reciepe to eliminate muzzle flash.
What is the "stuff" of which you speak? The choke?:confused:
 

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??? I'm with you, JJ, my crystal ball is in the shop for routine maintenance.
The original question is over two years old, but here goes. All 870 Express guns should be safe for steel but I would not go any tighter than modified, no matter how it is marked.
 

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With today's modern steel-shot wads, no, with an exception. Steel does not compress like lead. Shooting steel shot through tight chokes can 'ring' - read that 'bulge' - barrels just before or at the overly tight choke due to sudden pressure spikes. I personally would not shoot steel thru anything tighter than modified choke.
 

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In steel shot loads, the shot itself never touches the barrel. It's contained in a shot protector wad, usually specially made for steel shot.
 

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This subject is receiving more attention in the hunting community.
Does anyone have any video concerning lead vs steel shot?
 

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Well, if you are hunting waterfowl or in an area where lead is prohibited, you really have no choice. A lot of steel shot loads are loaded to higher velocities than lead loads to make up for steel's lower density and that too might contribute to ringing the barrel at the choke.
The good news is that steel patterns more tightly than lead and so you really don't need anything tighter than a modified or IC choke.
 

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I should of been more specific. Like how comparable steel loads(in weight and velocity) travel and pattern compared to conventional lead shot.
 

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Well, in factory loads weights are identical to those used in lead waterfowl loads, patterns are tighter, shot sizes are larger and velocities are higher
From the Rio Blue Steel data sheet---
12 Gauge 3-1/2" 1-3/8 oz. BBB 1,550
12 Gauge 3-1/2" 1-3/8 oz. BB 1,550
12 Gauge 3-1/2" 1-3/8 oz. # 2 1,550
12 Gauge 3" 1-1/4 oz. BB 1,400
12 Gauge 3" 1-1/4 oz. # 2 1,400
12 Gauge 3" 1-1/4 oz. # 4 1,400
12 Gauge 2-3/4" 1-1/8 oz. # 2 1,400
12 Gauge 2-3/4" 1-1/8 oz. # 4 1,400
I hope this helps!
I'm in the process if trying to figure out this steel shot business myself
 

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Haven't got any video. I agree with most of what's been said above though.
One of the main differences between the two, as already noted, is steel doesn't compress or deform. Therefore there aren't as many flyers in a steel pattern especially the higher velocity lead ones that tend to mash the pellets. High velocity steel is the way to go, experience has guided me towards faster rather than heavier.
Any literature I've seen shows shorter shot strings with steel but I'm not in a position to agree or disagree with this.
The main limitations of steel are downrange pellet velocity/energy so pellet size needs to be increased a couple of sizes to compensate. Eg where we used to use lead #4=#2 steel, #5=#3, #2=BB steel etc.
As I said above, I favor the higher velocity steel ammo. Used to load shells for ducks with 1 1/4 oz. of either 4s or 5's, this has changed to buying 1 1/8 oz loads with a muzzle velocity at least 1450 fps and preferably 1550 in a 3" shell. Usually plenty of felt recoil in an o/u but it's not terrible. I've never bought the real expensive premium ammo, I've found Federal and Remington to be reasonably effective.
Main thing I notice is that you don't need to lead the bird by as much using steel, due to the increased velocity, more noticeable going to the range and shooting behind the targets.. that and the shorter effective range. I try and limit my shots to 35 yards and if possible shoot birds coming towards you so the pellets penetrate the vitals, I've found longer shots after a departing bird are a wasted shot most of the time.
To the original question, I wouldn't go tighter than modified with steel. Although I believe some manufacturers mark their chokes full-steel ok, which is possibly the same constriction as a modified choke. A choke guage or verniers would confirm this.
 
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