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Hello, I'm a proud, new owner of a Beretta 686 SP1 (field) shotgun. I'm still waiting for my ammunition order to arrive. In the interim, I bought two A-Zoom snap caps so I could occasionally dry fire my new firearm. The manual states that this is acceptable. Also, A-Zoom snap caps seem to be one of the leaders in snap cap design (form and function). My question is WHY are these score marks occurring when my snap caps are ejected from the shotgun (if that's when it's occurring). I have visibly inspected the ejectors and all parts of the receiver. I can't see what (or when) this would happen. Is what I'm seeing "normal" for snap caps? I don't dry fire my shotgun that often, but I feel like I am following the guidelines for dry firing a weapon. I've enclosed a couple of pictures. I hope some one can provide a reasonable explanation. This is a brand new shotgun. Thank you for your input.
 

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Check the breech face of the shotgun.

The ejectors are beneath the rim, your caps are scored on their faces (top side of the rim)

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
UPDATE: Response from Beretta Technical Services

Hello LMUDOC2014:

Scoring of the snap caps is normal. The ejectors, which are quite sharp, may leave an indent on the rim.

Kind regards,

Beretta Technical Services
 

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Don't want to sound like a know it all, but snap caps are often used just to relax hammer/tumbler springs. This is from a period when leaf springs were the majority found in guns. When I want to dryfire my guns I usually use a fired case a couple of times and replace it when the primer indentations becomes too big. I have a lot of once fired cases on hand.

Some people use the snap cap after shooting not for dry firing. They insert the snap caps and pull the trigger/s to relax the springs and then take the gun apart removing the snap caps. They never give the ejectors the opportunity to pop the snap cap out. Because snap caps are a lot heavier than a fired case they worry about the ejector pushing out something so heavy, so fast, that is beyond what it is designed to do. The gun can then be reassembled without cocking it. The next time it is opened the empty ejectors kick. Obviously this doesn't work with a pump or auto. The drawback is that closing the gun cocks the ejectors. So something is always under tension.

I just reread this and it sounds a clear as mud. I hope its understandable.
 

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Don't want to sound like a know it all, but snap caps are often used just to relax hammer/tumbler springs. This is from a period when leaf springs were the majority found in guns. When I want to dryfire my guns I usually use a fired case a couple of times and replace it when the primer indentations becomes too big. I have a lot of once fired cases on hand.

Some people use the snap cap after shooting not for dry firing. They insert the snap caps and pull the trigger/s to relax the springs and then take the gun apart removing the snap caps. They never give the ejectors the opportunity to pop the snap cap out. Because snap caps are a lot heavier than a fired case they worry about the ejector pushing out something so heavy, so fast, that is beyond what it is designed to do. The gun can then be reassembled without cocking it. The next time it is opened the empty ejectors kick. Obviously this doesn't work with a pump or auto. The drawback is that closing the gun cocks the ejectors. So something is always under tension.

I just reread this and it sounds a clear as mud. I hope its understandable.
I own a 686 Sporting with ejectors. If I install the snap caps and pull the trigger twice both barrels click. Then if I open the breech to remove the snap caps the gun is re-cocked. That is the part where you lost me. You can't take the gun apart without opening the breech. However there is a small button just above the firing pins that if pushed will release the spring tension. It is very hard to push but it is there for that reason and no snap cap is needed.
 

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One Eye,

I also own a Beretta 686 Sporter. Great gun, great choice. This is what I do. Obviously in a safe place and direction place the snap caps in the chambers, close the gun, pull the trigger to release both hammers. Keep the gun closed. Now remove the forearm. If you've have never done this before just place the muzzles up, hold the barrels, release the latch lever on the forearm, and rotate it down off the barrels. Place the forearm on a table or bench. Now hold the barrels and open the gun normally. They will rotate normally and continue to go beyond there normal travel. Separate the barrels and remove the snap caps. Reassemble in reverse order. When you reassemble the gun it will be uncocked. Here is a copy of a Beretta manual. Page 20 gives a good representation of what I said.

"However there is a small button just above the firing pins that if pushed will release the spring tension. It is very hard to push but it is there for that reason and no snap cap is needed." The small button is there to release the top lever after the gun is dissembled. You push the lever slightly to the right to release tension, press the button in and the lever will go to the center of the receiver. The reason is that the owner can place his disassembled gun into a "take down case". Every time the gun is closed the button is pushed in. You can see a picture of one of these type cases by go to Jeff"s Outfitters. He sells the cases

Hope this helps.
 
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