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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you keep the shells in your side saddle? I keep them brass up as I'm worried that brass down the shells will slip out from the shotgun recoil when I fire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
depends.

On the side saddle I had on the strong side of my stock, I carried brass down. reach under with my weak side, pull down and its lines up to slide in the magazine.
I haven't run a side saddle on the weak side of my receiver, but I would say it would be the same. Just keep your weak side hand out from in front of your face.

As far as recoil causing the saddle to drop shells, its time to consider a different brand. a quality saddle should hold the shells without issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
depends.

On the side saddle I had on the strong side of my stock, I carried brass down. reach under with my weak side, pull down and its lines up to slide in the magazine.
I haven't run a side saddle on the weak side of my receiver, but I would say it would be the same. Just keep your weak side hand out from in front of your face.

As far as recoil causing the saddle to drop shells, its time to consider a different brand. a quality saddle should hold the shells without issue.
If they held shells that tightly it would impair you from removing them quickly.

Shotgun recoil can rattle anything loose over a few strong rounds fired. I have seen shells drop from high quality side saddles and tactical lights torn apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I keep it brass down, so it's faster to load.
I have a mesa tactical side saddle on my 930, and I have never had a round fall out. That includes many stages where I have run the tube and saddle dry, and been running through the whole stage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I keep my shells brass down for the reasons already mentioned. Also, not that any video is the end-all-be-all, if you watch the Magpul Dynamics video on shotguns, they recommend brass down on most shells as well, unless it is a shell they are loading directly into the receiver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ahhh... great info and explanations guys. I am very new to the whole sd shotgun thing and have been carrying on side-saddle with brass up.... no reason, just how I put them in there.

The reasoning for economy of motion sounds very valid, and I'll have to try it!

Glad the OP asked... not even something I knew enough to wonder about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Brass down on my 590. Ease of reloads and prevents light from reflectin' off the shiny stuff in hypothetical low light combat situations although I don't think the zombies will notice. Never jarred any rounds loose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
brass down.

cause that's what I was taught.

I dont have enough experience with shotguns to say whether or not the shells can actually slide out, but I can say this: during and before our shotgun quals we put many, many rounds downrange and never once did I or anyone else in my class have shells fall out of their shell holders.

It is important to note that the force from the recoil of a shotgun is not vertical but horizontal, which may explain why the shells dont fall out from recoil. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Brass down for loading purposes. Never had a round slide at all and I have man fingers so they aren't too tight to remove. I keep the two closest to my face brass up for trigger finger clearance since I shoot lefty.
 
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