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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I recently just bought a Remington 1100. When I first tried to shoot the gun, it wouldn’t cycle, this is almost always the barrel seal. So I replaced it, but the gun still won’t cycle, I have another 1100 that shoots fine, so I ran a few of the same shells through it and it cycled fine just to make sure my shells weren’t the issue, so then I started changing parts over I started with the barrel, the gun didn’t cycle. I looked closer and my good 1100 has a rubber o-ring and the original metal barrel seal, it’s like a triangular split ring, I put that on my other gun with the o-ring and the barrel that came on the gun, and it still wouldn’t cycle, The gas ports on the barrel are clean, so then I put the barrel from my good 1100 on the one I just bought and it cycled fine with the split ring and o-ring. I’m not sure exactly what is wrong here. I have looked and I bought a brand new piston and piston seal, as well as Remingtons gas system upgrade kit, and a brand new bolt assembly, but I can’t seem to find the metal split ring. From what I’ve read they are very rare, but is there any way I can work around this, maybe a wider o-ring? Or is the barrel bad? Or am I SOL? I have also looked at drawings on the 1100 and it doesn’t even show the split ring as being part of the gun. Hopefully somebody has seen or heard of this issue.
Also the markings on the barrel say that the gun I just bought is a 1983, but who knows if the barrel was swapped.
 

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If your old barrel works fine on your gun then it is the barrel, most likely somewhere with the gas system. Are you absolutely sure the ports are completely clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes sir.
I ran a wire through both gas ports, but the barrel on my good 1100 would only work on the gun IF the metal split ring was in front of the barrel seal. I figure the ring is being used as a backer for the o ring so the gas pressure doesn’t blow past it
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Update,
I think I figured it out, a friend of mine has an 1100 that belonged to his grandpa. He had an extra barrel that he would sell me. I explained my issues as we looked over his gun to make sure I wasn’t missing anything, I noticed that his gas piston was backward, he says that he could run hot reloads in his gun but not store bought shells, so I put my piston backwards as well and the gun ran like a dream. Finally got my new piston and seal in the mail and put it on the correct way, instantly noticed that the piston was much tighter on the gun that what it had, ran a whole box of shells through and the gun is perfect. So the barrel is good, and the piston was bad. I wondered how it also ran fine with the piston reversed so I called one of the old timers I always bird hunted with, he also has owned several 1100’s. He said that it was a quick fix if you had cycling issues and a new barrel seal didn’t fix it, or if the piston was wore out. Every barrel has a chamfer on the inside that oddly matches the chamfer on the back of the piston, when the piston is reversed, because the piston and seal are split rings the action is able to push the piston to where it clamps down on the magazine tube, creating a better seal. This is the first time I have ever heard of this being done to a 1100, and I have been shooting them for about 12 years. Hopefully this helps someone who has the same issue as I have. Thanks.
 

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I have owned several 1100's in all gauges (except 16).

The split ring part you are describing is the Piston Seal. There are three parts that are integral in making an 1100 function properly. The O-Ring, the Piston, and the Piston Seal.

All are necessary...and in the correct direction and in the correct order. The Piston and Piston seal will NEVER wear out...but you should have a few O-rings on hand. Keeping an 1100 clean is fairly important, however I had a 12 gauge B-Skeet that would shoot into the 1000's of rounds without needing a thorough cleaning. I had a 28 gauge that needed to be cleaned every hundred rounds or so.

My B-Skeet had more than 40K rounds through it without more than any routine issues. My .410 and 20 gauge always seemed to need something worked on. I sold all as a set back in 1992 or so, and wish I had them back. I still have a couple of 12 gauges that I have not shot in close to 20 years. I need to pull them out and give them a try as I'm fiddling with some 12 gauge buckshot loads.

Good luck and all the best.
 
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