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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at Academy the other day, and they have a Mossberg 500 there (wood stock and forearm) for $209.

I was pretty impressed with the price, because the last time I remember buying a Mossberg 500 in 12 gauge, I remember it being in the mid $300's - and that was SEVERAL years ago.

Is that about right these days, or does Academy just have a really good price on them?

I'm in the market for a .410, and was going to buy a single shot H&R, but at the price of this Mossberg... I just might buy it - unless someone can tell me something else.

I went in today for their grand opening. I don't remember the model number, but the Mossberg "Maverick" in 20 and 12 gauge was $160. That's cheap as heck for a pump shotgun! Are these lower quality (i.e. "inferior") guns, or has Mossberg just dropped their prices?

All the best,
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
You mentioned .410, and I was wondering if you had seen a pistol called "The Judge," made by Taurus. It fires both a .410 shotgun shell AND a .45 Long Colt. I think the price is around $400, which is more than what you're talking about with the other guns. I thought I'd tell you about this since you said you were in the market for a .410.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I'm familiar with the Judge. I was buying this as my son's first shotgun. I'm going to squirrel / rabbit hunt with it until he is old enough to shoot it. I figured at this price, I'd pick it up.
All the best,
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do your son a HUGE favor and forget the .410 shotgun.

The .410 is an experts weapon.

The .410 shotgun is actually a 67½ gauge.

Get a 20 gauge or a 28 gauge if you can find one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
An "experts" weapon? I've shot .410's before, and I seldom ever came home without my limit of squirrel or rabbit. And I wouldn't consider myself to be an "expert"... just an average shooter.

I already own a 20 and a 12 gauge. Really don't have much of a desire for a 28 gauge, as I never see anyone stock shells.

Thanks for the post though.

All the best,
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thats a pretty good price for a mossberg 500. I think the cheapest I've seen is around $240, of course I haven't looked at 410s at all though, just 12 gauge.

You probably remember it being so much more because you probably are remembering the pricing on a different model of the 500. Mossberg has got at least a dozen, probably more, different models of 500 shottys on the market right now. And they can run from the low $200's to over $500 or $600, depending on their options and accessories.

Anyway, regardless, that seems like a pretty good buy. If you can afford it, I say go for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
An "experts" weapon? I've shot .410's before, and I seldom ever came home without my limit of squirrel or rabbit. And I wouldn't consider myself to be an "expert"... just an average shooter.

I already own a 20 and a 12 gauge. Really don't have much of a desire for a 28 gauge, as I never see anyone stock shells.

Thanks for the post though.

All the best,
Glenn
I own a mossberg 500e in .410...picked it a couple weeks ago in trade, it's a fun shotgun to shoot, the only downfall is that .410 is generally more expsensive then 20 and 12 gauge. The .410 is both a beginners and an experts shot gun, seldom to you see middle of the road shooters using a .410. I don't believe the .410 gets the credit it deservs as it serves a purpose just like the mouse gun .22. You can hunt with it, you can have fun at the range with it and in home defensive distances with the right load it will bring down a baddy just the same as your big caliber cartridges. In your case for a young shooter it's an excellent starter shot gun to get him used to shooting and hunting as it's ligher recoil will not intimidate him the way a 12 or 20 might, I used a .410 to introduce my wife into shooting, now my .410 is her .410, she simply does not like shooting big gauges and big calibers.

Around 200 plus or minus a small bit is a good price, you may even search around for a used .410 in gun stores and pawn shops and find an even cheaper price. Your son will love it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
An "experts" weapon? I've shot .410's before, and I seldom ever came home without my limit of squirrel or rabbit. And I wouldn't consider myself to be an "expert"... just an average shooter.

I already own a 20 and a 12 gauge. Really don't have much of a desire for a 28 gauge, as I never see anyone stock shells.

Thanks for the post though.

All the best,
Glenn
Squirrel or Rabbit are more often static targets.

Try hitting a moving quail with a .410 or better yet. Take one duck hunting or pheasant hunting.

I have a buddy who was a ranked skeet shooter years ago. .410 is the round that separates the men from the boys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cajuntec,

If you are looking for an inexpensive .410 for a young one look at the Rossi Matched Pair or Trifecta single shots.

Right now Dicks Sporting goods has the Matched pair with a.410 and .22LR barrel (or 20 ga .22LR) on sale for $89. I have a friend that picked one up in .20 and .22LR for his son, nice little gun. We've used the gun on 2 shooting camp outs for the boy scouts. The Trifecta comes with 3 barrels, 20 ga, .22LR and .243. You also can send the guns back to Rossi to have another barrel fitted, they make a .50 Cal Black Powder barrel for the 20 ga frame and .45 cal for the .410 frame.

You could buy one gun and get a shotgun, rifle, rimfire, and black powder.

Cannibul does have some truth in his words about the .410. It has a smaller shot payload and usually is found in a fixed full choke barrel. But the .410 is smaller and lighter than a 20 Ga. We get quite a few kids in scouts that phyisically can't hold even the 20 ga guns. That and I shot my first duck with a Winchester 42 .410 with full choke, so it can be done.

You don't mention the age or size of your son. If he physically can handle a 20 ga he will be better off with one. But if he's still on the small side get him the .410, get him out in the woods an teach him right before video games turn his brain to jelly and he won't know what the outdoors is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
vafish,
I saw the Rossi matched pair .410 / .22 at Dicks the other day. At the store I went to, they weren't on sale - regular price was somewhere around $150 if I'm remembering right. I didn't know much about them, so I passed. Seeing your post though, I think it's worth a re-look.

I had several reasons that I was looking for a .410 only. Let me back up a bit. Hopefully my thought process makes sence, but I have been known to be "off" before. :mrgreen:

My son is not old enough to shoot a .410 yet. Actually, he's not mentally old enough to shoot any real firearm yet. He's not quite 5 - He turns 5 on Christmas day this year. He has a huge interest in firearms, which scares my wife a bit. She's not scared of firearms at all - she's scared of how interested he is in them. After he watched Pirates of the Carribean, he was "pistol happy". He saw a fake Pirates of the Carribean pistol in a toy store and wanted it. My wife, not thinking anything of it, bought it for him. That night, he was running around the house, pointing it at both of us, quoting lines from the movie. I reprimanded him for pointing the toy gun at me.

I have mixed feelings about the reprimand. As a kid, my friends and I played cowboys and indians, etc... I've shot paintballs at people on a range. So I feel like a hypocrite telling my son not to aim a toy gun at me. However, the reason I feel the way I do is...

Everytime I take a firearm out of my gunsafe - for hunting, cleaning, range shooting, etc... my son wants to know when he's going to get one of his own. He just about flipped out the other day when I came home with my XD40SC. He happened to walk into my bedroom right as I was putting it back in it's box. First words out of his mouth, as his eyes were wide open, looking very excited... "Ooooooooohhhhh. Is that one for ME daddy?" I quickly put it away and told him "no son, that's a real gun". His reply, "When am I going to get a real gun daddy?". My reply of "when you get older" just about brought him to tears.

But it scares me a bit that he is so interested in firearms at this early age. I don't own a pistol safe (yet), but after that afternoon... I'm buying one. Even though they are WAY out of his reach, kids can do some amazing things, and I have no doubt that if he really wanted to, he would find a way to reach it. Therefore, I removed the guns, ammo and loaded magazines from the bedroom and stored them in the closet, re-positioning the gun cases on the shelf so that they weren't as visable to him. I will have a pistol safe by the end of this week.

When I feel that he is responsible enough to shoot, I want to take him to the range. Right now, I don't think he is. His attention span just isn't long enough. Even with me standing right there, watching his every move, I still don't feel it's time yet. Maybe I'm being over-protective, but I'd rather be safe than sorry.

So, there is a .22 Glenfield model 20 sitting in my gun safe right now. I rebuilt it, and it's a shooter. Nice little lightweight 22 bolt action. Perfect for his first .22 - when I feel he is ready for it.

So I have a .22 for him, and wanted to get a .410 as his first shotgun... for more than one reason. First, I love shooting the .410's - I always have. I have other shotguns in both 20 and 12. I still like shooting .410's. I can use it until he gets old enough to shoot. I think H&R's little single shot shotguns are perfect for teaching a youngster - no semi-auto's, etc... I'm even a little sceptical about the pump. I want him to concentrate on the first shot, and make it count. I don't want him thinking "If I miss, I have two more shots". That is why I like that Glenfield .22 also - I think the little bolt action will not only be fun for him to shoot, but it will also make him concentrate on the shot. That's another reason I like the .410's - they don't throw out as many pellets as a 20 or 12. Make the shot count. The smaller amount of pellets generally doesn't mess the meat up as bad either, as I like to eat squirrel and rabbit.

Is my way of thinking jacked up, or am I making sense?

Sorry for the long post.

All the best,
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
fvafish,
I saw the Rossi matched pair .410 / .22 at Dicks the other day. At the store I went to, they weren't on sale - regular price was somewhere around $150 if I'm remembering right. I didn't know much about them, so I passed. Seeing your post though, I think it's worth a re-look.

I had several reasons that I was looking for a .410 only. Let me back up a bit. Hopefully my thought process makes sence, but I have been known to be "off" before. :mrgreen:

My son is not old enough to shoot a .410 yet. Actually, he's not mentally old enough to shoot any real firearm yet. He's not quite 5 - He turns 5 on Christmas day this year. He has a huge interest in firearms, which scares my wife a bit. She's not scared of firearms at all - she's scared of how interested he is in them. After he watched Pirates of the Carribean, he was "pistol happy". He saw a fake Pirates of the Carribean pistol in a toy store and wanted it. My wife, not thinking anything of it, bought it for him. That night, he was running around the house, pointing it at both of us, quoting lines from the movie. I reprimanded him for pointing the toy gun at me.

I have mixed feelings about the reprimand. As a kid, my friends and I played cowboys and indians, etc... I've shot paintballs at people on a range. So I feel like a hypocrite telling my son not to aim a toy gun at me. However, the reason I feel the way I do is...

Everytime I take a firearm out o my gunsafe - for hunting, cleaning, range shooting, etc... my son wants to know when he's going to get one of his own. He just about flipped out the other day when I came home with my XD40SC. He happened to walk into my bedroom right as I was putting it back in it's box. First words out of his mouth, as his eyes were wide open, looking very excited... "Ooooooooohhhhh. Is that one for ME daddy?" I quickly put it away and told him "no son, that's a real gun". His reply, "When am I going to get a real gun daddy?". My reply of "when you get older" just about brought him to tears.

But it scares me a bit that he is so interested in firearms at this early age. I don't own a pistol safe (yet), but after that afternoon... I'm buying one. Even though they are WAY out of his reach, kids can do some amazing things, and I have no doubt that if he really wanted to, he would find a way to reach it. Therefore, I removed the guns, ammo and loaded magazines from the bedroom and stored them in the closet, re-positioning the gun cases on the shelf so that they weren't as visable to him. I will have a pistol safe by the end of this week.

When I feel that he is responsible enough to shoot, I want to take him to the range. Right now, I don't think he is. His attention span just isn't long enough. Even with me standing right there, watching his every move, I still don't feel it's time yet. Maybe I'm being over-protective, but I'd rather be safe than sorry.

So, there is a .22 Glenfield model 20 sitting in my gun safe right now. I rebuilt it, and it's a shooter. Nice little lightweight 22 bolt action. Perfect for his first .22 - when I feel he is ready for it.

So I have a .22 for him, and wanted to get a .410 as his first shotgun... for more than one reason. First, I love shooting the .410's - I always have. I have other shotguns in both 20 and 12. I still like shooting .410's. I can use it until he gets old enough to shoot. I think H&R's little single shot shotguns are perfect for teaching a youngster - no semi-auto's, etc... I'm even a little sceptical about the pump. I want him to concentrate on the first shot, and make it count. I don't want him thinking "If I miss, I have two more shots". That is why I like that Glenfield .22 also - I think the little bolt action will not only be fun for him to shoot, but it will also make him concentrate on the shot. That's another reason I like the .410's - they don't throw out as many pellets as a 20 or 12. Make the shot count. The smaller amount of pellets generally doesn't mess the meat up as bad either, as I like to eat squirrel and rabbit.

Is my way of thinking jacked up, or am I making sense?

Sorry for the long post.

All the best,
Glenn
Making sense on a lot of things, not making sense on others. ;)

First, you are making a lot of sense thinking you should get a gun safe. I have 4 kids, oldest is now almost 17, youngest is 9. At age 5 there is very few places you can hide something that they can't get into. Even one of the cheap $89 locking metal cabinets that's not really a safe will keep the kids out though, as long as you don't leave the keys laying around for them.

In my opinion 5 is the perfect age to start teaching them about guns and how to shoot them safely. But, I'd start them with an air rifle or BB gun. Keep it in the safe with your guns, allow it's use only under strict supervision. At age 5 kids need lots of repetition to commit things to memory. An air rifle will allow you to practice at home in the basement or garage more frequently than going to the range. Beeman has a new junior air rifle coming out, probably shortly after Christmas, that should be about right for your son.

After a year or so of shooting air rifles, when they have demonstrated the maturity you think they need, then introduce them a .22 LR. I don't think they will be ready for a .410 until they are 7 or 8 at least.

I think .410's are good beginners shotguns, as long as you understand their limitations. Like I said I started out on a Winchester 42 pump gun in .410, My dad had a 12 ga and my older brother got the 20 ga. I whacked a lot of grouse with that little pump gun. Later when I had my own money to spend I bought a 12 ga pump gun. It was much better for duck and goose hunting than the little .410 was. But after shooting 1 close in grouse and shredding it with the 12 ga I went back to the .410 for grouse, rabbit, and squirrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I can second the H&R single as a great starter. I have one in my closet,that was my first shotgun, that is...well...over 25yrs old and still fires like a dream.

I don't have experience with the pump that you mention, but I do have some thoughts from when I was young, hunting with my cousin. We both had .410s, my single and his Mossy pump. I don't think I EVER remember him getting more than 1 shot off before an FTE. I don't know if it was the length of the shell, or the poor engineering, but his gun was really just a single shot when it came down to it.

Maybe the newer ones aren't as problematic?????
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
:cool: .... ok... I found something "new" that I'm now thinking of getting instead of the Mossberg pump. I found that same price on the Mossberg 500 in two other stores, so I guess that's the normal price on it.

Thinking about what has been posted here and elsewhere, I think I'm going to take the advice of "pellet gun" as a starter for my son, then work him up to a .22 later, and eventually a shotgun.

But I still want a .410 - but this one will probably stay in my possession as a "fun" gun. I found a Stoeger Double Barrel "Uplander" shotgun. Nice. Fairly inexpensive too - about $350. :lol:

All the best,
Glenn
 
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