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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a shooter-grade 12ga Trojan a few months back. came with a old canvas/leather/fleece gun-case that has a rickety old wood sectional cleaning rod and a gunsmith overhaul receipt from the 1990's in the 'extra barrel' pocket. The receipt itself detailing charges for rust blueing action and barrel...hot blue small parts plus polish/prep...restocking...parts(wood)..etc. Definitely not Turnbull quality work...however it's nice enough to be presented to my shoulder for small game hunting. Don't have to worry about de-grading a collector's piece either as it has no original finish or wood to de-grade.

Anyhow...it's a sweet shooting old double-gun. Shot quite a few dove with it...busted some clay. just using it like it was a decent modern 12ga double barrel. That's when I got curious and looked-up the serial number online and discovered the Trojan is way older than I thought!!

I figured it to be maybe a 1930's/40's made gun. Nope..the serial number dates it to 1913. Older than I thought for sure.

The gun's tight and on face. bore's are good..barrels ring fantastic..safety and all the mechanics appear fine. Still an old gun though...no steel or 'grandpa's whammy-shells' for sure. I thought it prudent to just stick to whatever power-level shells an ancient Trojan was designed for.

So just what dram/shot weight loads would you guys shoot in an old refurbed Parker Trojan 12ga??
 

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dont go over 1 1/8 and make sure the lock up isnt loose.
is it damascus bbls?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
"Trojan Steel" barrels...been shooting 3 dram eq. 1 1/8 oz various size lead shot loads.

The breech is tight/on-face with forearm on or off the gun.

Yeh...I'm familiar with Damascus barrels. I own a old old Colt 1879 hammer double that has seen better days...beautiful barrels but battered..pitted..paper thin at the muzzles...
 

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I wouldn't worry about the steel, the Trojans were tough. I'd worry about the 100+ year-old wood that is soaking up the recoil. Restocking is not cheap. I have a J.P. Sauer 16ga hammergun made in 1894 with Krupp steel barrels that would likely handle most modern ammo, but I feed it light 3/4oz loads to baby that old wood.
As someone else posted, I'd stay with target-load stuff, max 1-1/8 oz at no more than 1200 fps or 3 dr equiv, to use our antiquated system. Enjoy it!
 

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Oops, I missed that in your original post.:eek:
I would think that it will easily take your 1-1/8oz 3-dram stuff for many years to come. Not much need for hotter stuff than that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I ran errands for my lady yesterday...which took me close to my favored gunstore.

Anyhow...I looked for some 12ga snap-caps and they were sold out of my gauge. Oh well. I forget the brand the store was offering...but they looked sort-of cheap and cheesy! made from transparent red plastic.

It's not that I do much or any dry-firing of any of my guns..shotgun, rifle, or handguns(excepting Glocks and a couple old .25 auto's that must be dry-fired to field-strip)....I just thought it might be prudent to store the ancient Parker un-cocked and would rather 'snap' it on a snap-cap or just not bother to un-cock it at all....

So should I store my really old Trojan with the hammers down on snap-caps or just leave it cocked and safe??
 

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Millions of shotguns have been stored for hundreds of years with the hammers cocked. They still shoot. I'm not a big fan of snap caps, there have been too many true stories of snap caps 'going off' when someone goofed and put in a live shell instead.
The Parker collector's association says it is perfectly safe to dry-fire 'hammerless' Parkers so you can safely do it without snap-caps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeh....I imagine this shotgun has probably been cocked except when fired for better than 100 years.....
 

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I ran errands for my lady yesterday...which took me close to my favored gunstore.

Anyhow...I looked for some 12ga snap-caps and they were sold out of my gauge. Oh well. I forget the brand the store was offering...but they looked sort-of cheap and cheesy! made from transparent red plastic.

It's not that I do much or any dry-firing of any of my guns..shotgun, rifle, or handguns(excepting Glocks and a couple old .25 auto's that must be dry-fired to field-strip)....I just thought it might be prudent to store the ancient Parker un-cocked and would rather 'snap' it on a snap-cap or just not bother to un-cock it at all....

So should I store my really old Trojan with the hammers down on snap-caps or just leave it cocked and safe??
Do NOT get those red plastic POS. Get the aluminum AZOOMS or the solid nickle/brass ones from CSMC that have a spring loaded firing pin.

Neither will have the rim break off jamming them in your gun
 
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