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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,
I am trying to reason through the thought process of choosing one gun over another. I have read over and over that, if you are looking for a budget shotgun for skeet and trap, it is preferable to go with a autoloader than an inexpensive o/u. I just have not heard any rational for it. Why would a, say $700-$800 autoloader be a better choice than a similarly priced o/u? Just asking?
 

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I can think of 2 reasons right off the bat.
1, Auto holds more shells
2, Less Recoil for prolonged shooting.

Guns are like tools, you need different tools for each job, at least that's what I tell the wife. :p
 

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when semi's break, they fix easier.
cheap o&u's break...you usually end up tossing them out and end up getting that good one you were avoiding.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
when semi's break, they fix easier.
cheap o&u's break...you usually end up tossing them out and end up getting that good one you were avoiding.
Ok, I get that. But the one with the most moving parts is likely to break sooner. What exactly can break on an over under? Are the barrels not as robust as semi autos and pumps?
 

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Great question. I shoot trap and own O/Us, Semi-autos, and a pump. In time if you keep shooting you will end up buying more guns than you will care to admit. I would not agonize too much over where you start, but here are some general thoughts:
- winchester model 12 pumps are a classic trap gun, and while they are not as popular now, they have won more trap competitions than any other single gun. You can pick up a decent one used for $500 or so, and if you don't like it you can sell it for $500 or so (i would probably be your buyer).
- Well made O/Us will likely outlast their owners. My favorite gun is a Beretta BL-4 that belonged to my father. I would use it more often, but my wife usually grabs it before i do. She broke 18 / 25 with it the first time she shot trap. I don't think you can go wrong with an older Beretta or a Browning Superposed (if you consider a superposed make sure you google salt gun so don't end up buying problem gun). If you don't like them you can sell them for more or less what you paid.
- If you decide to go with a new semi-auto i would spend the extra few hundred to get into a browning, beretta, or Benelli. It will hurt a little more when you buy it, but you will feel a whole lot better every time you use it.

Hope that helps.
 

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jello...it would be triggers, sears, and ejectors. and instead of dropping in a new part, each requires a smith to put in and out.
and too, if its a cheap o&u, the pivot pins will wear, loosening the guns lock up and head space. again, a smith will need to fix it. so...owning an o&u has hidden costs, looming inside the smiths shop.

remember....hes asking for comparitive costs of guns costing 700.00.
a 700 o&u is not expensive. now if he wanted to pay 3000+ for one, id say go ahead, because he'd get years of use without a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bobski,
Great explanation. So, costs associated with the overall wear and tear of an o/u would be higher than the semi because of the repair cost.

Now, you know this question was coming: aside from spending $3000+, what is the cost breakpoint for a good new or used o/u? Is, say, a Citori ($1000 used, $2000 new) something to consider?

Thanks for all the great information.
 

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Whatever shotgun you may choose, gun "FIT" is the most important of all features to look for. You may pick up the most beautiful shotgun you ever layed eyes on and go out and feel like wrapping it around a tree because it doesn't point where your looking. I have O/U's, pumps, semiautos, and at one point bolt guns. I'm convinced you just can't beat a good pump gun for all around use. They work when you need them. If people tell you you can't shoot skeet or sporting clays with one. I'll show you two gents I shoot with that will clear a course with a pump. Semiautos I own are Remington 1100 and Beretta AL391. Both are solid shooters and I like them both. The 1100 is a classic but limited to 2 3/4 shells. If your looking at Remington, look at the 11-87. The Beretta AL391 is very nice, light and a true performer but there is about a grand difference in price compared to an 11-87 (new of course), don't be afraid to look at a nice used one. O/U's are very nice if thats what you like. I started with a cheap 20 guage O/U, like 400.00 cheap. Junk, don't do it. Then I splurged as a young buck and bought the (prettiest gun I had ever held for 1500.00) Browning Citori sporting 28" ported barrels O/U. Went directly to the skeet field and broke one(1) of 25 targets. I had guys that couldn't watch me anymore. They took me into the clubhouse and end result, it didn't fit me at all! Some pads, tape, and some love, I went back and broke 20 of 25. I now am 42 and I shoot a Beretta 682 gold sporting with adjustable comb, 30 inch ported barrels, and it just plain fits me. MAKE IT FIT! Good luck in your search, don't change your technique to make a gun fit to justify a purchase. You will try, I know, but resist it and you'll end up happy.
This video gives good insight on gun fit.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=jLLnGM3DXE0#!
 

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O/Us and SxS shotguns have always been more expensive to produce to the same standards of reliability as pumps and autos. In short, they require more careful fitting of parts as well as more precisely made parts.

If you've ever had a cheap double that had problems, this is all too obvious. Unlike a pump or auto, you don't get to simply drop in a new part and be back in business. Most of the time it means returning the gun to the factory.
 

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try to picture a shoe store. then try to picture a shoe company trying to fit one design shoe to all the people. its impossible, so what do they do? they make one shoe in 20 sizes. forget color....they just want to get the shoe on the foot first, then worry about pazazz later.

same with guns.

guns are designed to get you in the game, then in the old days, you took it to a fitter and had it fitted. the gun became custom fit to you. today, when buying old guns, odds are more than half if not more have been fitted to someone else and they are forever modified. so who comes along? naive new gun buyer who tries to shoot it and cant, because it doesnt fit.
the trend today is guns have endless options built into them. everythings adjustable. adjustable combs, adjustable pads, ribs, triggers, chokes, ga tube sets, etc....
so, all the owner has to do is tweek his own gun in and hes done.
but you pay for those options.
so gun makers still make guns in one size to fit all. and those are your usually your inexpensive guns.
rule of thumb. you buy a gun based on the usage you plan for it. if you are going to shoot 500 rounds a week...you buy a gun that can take it. if all youre going to do is lean it up in your closet for 360 days a year...you go cheap and adjust your body to the gun instead of adjusting the gun to your body.

older guns are built better. new guns are mass produced. expensive guns are expensive for a reason, they have options and are well made.
you get what you pay for.

biggest mistake shotgun buyers make is they look at the tag first. it should be the last thing you do.
you find a gun that fits like a glove. THEN you look at the tag and say to yourself...this is the price for a good fitting gun....and pay it!

go buy a car. and say to yourself you want a car fo 500.00. you can still buy cars today used for 500.00. but what are you getting for it? see my logic?
sometimes the extra cost is something you should want if you want performance. hope it helps.
 
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