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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made a another stab at laying in a receiver to take an old double barrel set I have had lying about. I am thinking it is the Model 325, but I am not completely sure. The floorplate is the only reliable place where these shotguns seem to be stamped with the model number, and that part was missing. The view I really needed was from the bottom of the hammerless receiver looking in, if the wedge bottom lock is present then it most likely is the 325. What throws me off is the single butterfly spring arrangement under the floorplate that is apparently the sear spring(s), covering the bottom of the top lever assembly. I can find no such part in schematics so far, but schematics for this specific model seem rare. Soon the receiver will arrive, and we will see exactly what we got.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
I remembered that Dhf8ka posted a picture of his Stevens 325 project not too long ago, so I went back and checked that post. Sure enough there is the butterfly sear spring pictured front and center. I am feeling better about my purchase now, most internal parts seem to be there, what are the odds the barrel set will go on close enough to fit up? Provided it is a 12 gauge receiver, maybe it will work with my barrel set, if it is 16 or a 20--I will not complain just put it in the incoming rack. This will give me something to tinker with till I get the Acraglas shortage sorted out for the LC Smith. It would be very nice if this old 325 could come together well enough to serve as my color-hardening Guinea pig prior to coloring the LC. cased325.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The receiver made it to the dealer this morning and I picked it up after work. It is sure good to get posting again, being unable to go forward on the LC build for lack of a simple red box of Acraglas was hard to take. With the epidemic loosening a bit, I expect that the almost magical, irreplaceable, gooey substance will be once again available. I sure never expected to have a shortage of Acraglas of all things. I would sooner do without toilet paper : ).

Okay, to take inventory of this new Stevens receiver. It is a Model 335. First the Patent marking--The Stevens Arms and Tool Company, Chicopee Falls, Mass, Patented Mar 19, 1907 indicates a manufacture date sometime during or after 1909. The patent, #847,659 to Ed Elder to J Stevens A&T Co. was for the floorplate actuated cocking cams and rods common to the Models 325 and 335 hammerless designs. The marking was changed when the patent came through, by my estimation that would have been during 1909. Next the triangle shaped pattern to the three screws that hold the floorplate on, versus the later production three screws centered and in line. This is the first variation, I think it may be a common part with the 325 series shotguns, although the floorplates will be stamped to the model they were shipped with. I do not have both floorplates in hand from the 325 and the early 335 to be entirely sure about this one. Next enter the big, stout one piece locking top snap, predecessor to the 311, versus the 225 or 325 styles with the screw hole on center that pushes the locking block forward. This change, coupled with demi bloc chopper lump barrel construction, was the important one. The system lasted through the Savage Fox model BSE production, and it is a very simple and a very robust way to lock up a side by side shotgun. This receiver, originally casehardened, was hot tank blued after a light application of the buffing wheels and it turned the most magnificent plum color. The internals were hot blued with no polishing, and they turned a dark blue black. They are in surprisingly newer crisp condition, you wonder why the case colors were polished off the receiver, they most likely were in pretty good shape at the time. Missing are the left hammer and strut, one mainspring, both hammer screws the safety button and its pin, and the trigger group in its entirety. The sear screw is present but heavily buggered and unsalvageable. We will try to get this one back together and operational without getting too carried away, it will serve as a dandy test piece for surface finishing the LC Smith, and then go into inventory as close to original guise as I can make it.
 

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