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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, I've been looking around for a new shotgun, my first actually. I wanted to get a tactical shotgun, preferably with a collapsible m4 style stock, and a pistol grip.

Ive looked at some Remmys and some Mossbergs. But I want this for the Range, and id like to take it hunting, so id like one that can take a slug barrel.


Any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The 870 or 500 would both still be good choices for what your looking at. you can buy a combo and get both barrels out the box. or upgrade on your own, since theirs a TON of aftermarket upgrades for both weapons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What you get depends a lot on what/how you hunt and the amount of cash you have.

The 870 vs. 500 debate still rages on to this day. Do some searching online and decide for yourself which you like more. Keep in mind that any extended magazine tubes may need to be plugged for hunting. Also dont forget companies like Benelli who also offer affordable tactical options.

If you plan to hunt past 50 yards with the shotgun, you may want to steer clear of many combo deals out there. A rifled shotgun barrel (preferably with a cantilever scope mount) will reach out farther (and allow you to mount a scope). Some companies do offer shot/rifled barrel combos, some dont. Once again, this could be a decision point. Research will go a long way.

Just to offer some more advice, I was in the same basic predicament. I wanted a shotgun for shooting clays but also wanted to use it for deer hunting. I knew I wanted a Remington 870 based on my familiarity with the operation and dislike of some features on the Mossbergs and Benellis. So instead of getting a combo that had the shot barrel and 'deer barrel' (just a shorter smoothbore barrel with iron sights) I just bought a shotgun as if I was getting it solely for clays. Then I found a fully rifled barrel with cantilever scope mount (and scope!) online. Swap the barrels and I can shoot clays or deer!

In your case, many aftermarket accessories are available to allow adjustable stocks as well as pistol grips.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I want to spend 450-650 on this setup. I want a Remington 870, I think I will take your advice and get a barrel for clay shooting, and find one for slugs when hunting seasons is closer. I will mostly be going for Deer in the state of Maine, maybe birds and Turkeys if i have the time.

How easy is it to swap the barrels, and will every model do this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I want to spend 450-650 on this setup. I want a Remington 870, I think I will take your advice and get a barrel for clay shooting, and find one for slugs when hunting seasons is closer. I will mostly be going for Deer in the state of Maine, maybe birds and Turkeys if i have the time.

How easy is it to swap the barrels, and will every model do this?
I've shot two different Mossberg 500's, and I own the 870 Express. Both are excellent shotguns and you can't go wrong with either. My 870 has had some problems with low brass/aluminum shells, but Remington is taking care of that. Hopefully i'll get it back soon, I just got a new trap and i'm dieing to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I want to spend 450-650 on this setup. I want a Remington 870, I think I will take your advice and get a barrel for clay shooting, and find one for slugs when hunting seasons is closer. I will mostly be going for Deer in the state of Maine, maybe birds and Turkeys if i have the time.

How easy is it to swap the barrels, and will every model do this?
Barrel swap is VERY simple on both the Remington 870 and the Mossberg 500. Unscrew a cap and slide off the barrel. Slide new barrel on, screw in cap, done.

I spent about $500 total getting the 870 with a 28" barrel and then later purchasing a fully rifled cantilever barrel/scope combo from Buds Gun Shop. Ordered both at the same time, got the slug barrel midway through second season :cry:. Oh well, I used it for late winter! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Personally I also like the feel of the 870 better as well. Now working for a ffl, I would reccomend finding an 870 combo. Can easily find one with a 28'' smooth bore/ 24'' rifled combo. Usually for less then buying seperate as well. IF you do your research you can find 870 combos with you 18 1/2'' barrel/ 28" smooth as well. All depends what barrels you plan on using most/first.For starters id look 18.5/28 for HD/trap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What you get depends a lot on what/how you hunt and the amount of cash you have.

The 870 vs. 500 debate still rages on to this day. Do some searching online and decide for yourself which you like more. Keep in mind that any extended magazine tubes may need to be plugged for hunting. Also dont forget companies like Benelli who also offer affordable tactical options.
the 870, the 500, the Maverick, and the Nova are all great guns.
The Nova is going to be the most expensive, the Maverick the cheapest.
The OP needs to handle all of the above before making the decision. Everything from how the gun fits and how naturally it points to how well the controls work for you. Personally, there are three features I like on my Maverick over everyone else.
1. the slop that makes the gun feel like it will run in any condition. snow, ice, mud, rain, abuse, its not going to jam
2. The loading gate (or lack there of) that doesn't hang my thumb or glove when a dove is headed at me and Im trying to cram another round in the magazine.
3. The safety being located in front of the trigger, I can index my finger there, snap it off, and back to the trigger, one motion, not back, then forward, then squeeze.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Everyone is stating the best answers, so all I can really say is. Get what you can afford, what feels best to you, looks best, comes with the most. Whatever you want to break it down as, you will end up with a great gun. Even the cheapest of the ones listed,(the maverick) is still a hell of a gun. Its just a rebadged mossy 500. Tons of aftermarket for all of these guns. All easy to work on, all very well built. I love my 500, the safety on top, the slide release, and all the aftermarket made me buy one. Some people don't like the slide release where its at, as well as where the safety is at. So find one that you like, can afford, can get what you want for it, and shoot it a ton! Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
OP, when you say "range" are you referring to trap, skeet, sporting clays or just plinking around? If you're thinking about shooting competitive trap, I'd probably steer away from a pump or semi-auto. Certainly, you can use them to shoot trap but ejecting the shells and shooting doubles will prove somewhat annoying and challenging.

When shooting trap, you will have a competitor standing to your right 80% of the time. They tend to get testy if you eject a shell out of your pump gun or semi-auto and it hits them. So, you have to figure out a way to prevent that from happening. You can put a rubber band over the ejection port or try to catch the empties in your hand ... whatever you do, it's a bit annoying.

And, shooting doubles with a pump gun is going to be a bit more challenging than with an O/U or SxS.

Just a few thoughts. Not sure if they apply to you or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OP, when you say "range" are you referring to trap, skeet, sporting clays or just plinking around? If you're thinking about shooting competitive trap, I'd probably steer away from a pump or semi-auto. Certainly, you can use them to shoot trap but ejecting the shells and shooting doubles will prove somewhat annoying and challenging.

When shooting trap, you will have a competitor standing to your right 80% of the time. They tend to get testy if you eject a shell out of your pump gun or semi-auto and it hits them. So, you have to figure out a way to prevent that from happening. You can put a rubber band over the ejection port or try to catch the empties in your hand ... whatever you do, it's a bit annoying.

And, shooting doubles with a pump gun is going to be a bit more challenging than with an O/U or SxS.

Just a few thoughts. Not sure if they apply to you or not.
I was thinking clays, plinking, and skeet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OP, when you say "range" are you referring to trap, skeet, sporting clays or just plinking around? If you're thinking about shooting competitive trap, I'd probably steer away from a pump or semi-auto. Certainly, you can use them to shoot trap but ejecting the shells and shooting doubles will prove somewhat annoying and challenging.

When shooting trap, you will have a competitor standing to your right 80% of the time. They tend to get testy if you eject a shell out of your pump gun or semi-auto and it hits them. So, you have to figure out a way to prevent that from happening. You can put a rubber band over the ejection port or try to catch the empties in your hand ... whatever you do, it's a bit annoying.

And, shooting doubles with a pump gun is going to be a bit more challenging than with an O/U or SxS.

Just a few thoughts. Not sure if they apply to you or not.
Good points on the competitive trap.
Any competitive game, you will want more specialized equipment. Ive shot skeet with my maverick. Ive shot sporting clays with my maverick. Ive shot dove, squirrel, rabbit and turkey with my Maverick. Yeah, doubles are a challenge with a pump gun, so is keeping it fed when the dove are flying.
As a first time shotgun owner, I doubt he is looking to be shooting competitive trap regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
As a first time shotgun owner, I doubt he is looking to be shooting competitive trap regularly.
I only pointed it out because he didn't define "range". I see he's thinking about "clays" (Sporting Clays?), "plinking" and "skeet".

I still think shooting doubles in Sporting Clays and Skeet are going to be tough with a pump - especially for a first-time shotgun owner. With that said, if you get to the point where you can consistently shoot doubles with a pump gun, you'll be a very good shotgunner. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I only pointed it out because he didn't define "range". I see he's thinking about "clays" (Sporting Clays?), "plinking" and "skeet".

I still think shooting doubles in Sporting Clays and Skeet are going to be tough with a pump - especially for a first-time shotgun owner. With that said, if you get to the point where you can consistently shoot doubles with a pump gun, you'll be a very good shotgunner. :D
when a new guy is talking taking the shotgun to the range, Im thinking him and a buddy or two are going to the local range with a plastic clay thrower.

Ill also agree with you, doubles with a pump gun is tough. I've run a pump gun since I was 12 and its still a challenge at times to get off 2 accurate shots in about a second while 1. changing direction of travel and 2. finding the second bird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
i have a mossberg maveric 88 12g and its an awesome shotgun. its cheap and is very close to a 500 but for less cash. depending on where you get it you can find them with a variety of different barrel/magtube/stocks.
 
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