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Discussion Starter · #141 ·
. . . a few hours later into the evening the initial fill has set up enough to unwrap the tape, and to turn the stock with the toe uppermost, dam and fill the pistol grip area. The process was the same, only a smaller amount of glass was used. At this time we can look over the first fill a little and see what we got.

Picture #1, You can see that the Acraglas penetrated the crack a full inch where it was bearing against the tape. An approximately 1/2 inch of the very bottom of the crack where it feathers out to the current surface did not fill, but nearly 3/8 inch of this whole side surface will be removed to thin the stock down to finish size. I am pretty sure we will get under it and cut out this crack by the time we are 1/4 inch down.

Picture #2 The seasoning crack on the other top side did not fill at all for whatever reason, probably because my clamping blocked the flow, but then again I am not too concerned because I figured that crack would pretty much cut out in its entirety from the get go. It is glassed up solid at the upper bottom end, and that is where it needed to.

Picture #3 The pistol grip fill in place, the wedge removed and the acraglas is setting up. I am pretty sure we got a good fill job this first try, but when we begin to cut the wood away we will know for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #142 ·
Hey All
Monday and Tuesday I showed up an hour early at work and got the two sides of the butt stock milled down. I cut the surfaces down to 1/16 proud of the sidelock flats and milled both smooth in order to get a better look at the glassing job on the cracks.

Picture #1 is the set up for the first side Monday morning. A small piece of rubber is used in the vise to hold the odd shape tight against the back solid jaw of the vise. About 1/32 depth cut per step with the approximately 1 inch end mill is the order of the day. The stock is not the most rigidly mounted this way, and these light cuts allow the stock to be surfaced accurately without digging in, splintering the edges, or moving anything.

Picture #2 the milling is stopped when the wood over the sidelock area measures 1/16 proud of the sidelock flat of the frame, allowing enough wood to make all the surfaces flat and true again, and to re-establish the exact vertical centerline of the stock in relation to the wooden "try" barrel assembly.

Picture #3 the operation has been repeated Tuesday morning on the opposite side of the stock, arriving at the same 1/16 proud cut on the second side.

Picture #4 is the worst of the glassed up seasoning cracks after surfacing. I light coat of water has been applied to the wood to give an impression of what it should look like finished. The Acraglas is ever so much darker than the wood, but the wood will accept stain, and the glass won't so the best blend possible can be achieved. This crack is severe enough to show in the finished stock so every attempt to camouflage it will be undertaken. As to strength, the glass will be stronger than the wood ever was.

Pictures #4 and #5 the stock is photographed left and right sides with a bit of water applied to give a general idea of what the stock will look like when finished. It turned out to be a fairly nice straight grained piece of black walnut. I could get used to a bit more figure, but the staight-grained wood is always the stronger type. Applied to a side lock shotgun with the frame end of the stock so thoroughly hollowed out to accept all the lock, trigger, safely and top snap parts, probably this is not a bad plan. Always the temptation is there to get fancy, but the theme here has been to produce a working gun and this wood should work nicely for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #143 ·
Hey All
Now that we have the stock milled flat to 1/16 thickness over the lock flats on the frame, it is on to the next few steps. If you are one of those fortunate folks who has a full collection of LC Smith doubles in the rack behind your workbench, you can pull a suitable specimen off the wall and take all the pertinent dimensions from it. Otherwise, if you are like me, and only have one you can get suitable dimensions by using pictures online to get the look you are after in the finished product. Enter scaling, kind of a neat drafting trick that gets you very close.
Picture #1 In order to draw the finished "look" of the stock on one flat side, I found a 16 gauge Featherweight for sale online with a couple of good pictures of a stock from a similar era. The stock had been fitted with a rubber pad, but the length of pull looked pretty much right on, and I already have the pitch of the butt plate established. Scaling is accomplished by starting with a picture and measuring a known dimension with calipers, in this case, and then transferring that dimension to a known dimension on the actual stock. I measured the length of pull on the picture to start with, then found my conversion factor. This factor is any constant number that when multiplied by the measured dimension on the picture yields the actual dimension. Simple division of measured dimension/actual dimension arrives at the constant, and it does not change for any other dimension you need to know.

Picture #3, #4 This technique is applied to the trigger guard in order to find the correct location of the front trigger. I knew when I fitted this trigger in the plate it was resting a bit too far back for double trigger gun, now it is time to establish just how far back to move it before fitting up the butt plate and establishing the finished length of pull. Picture #2 by laying the frame over a downloaded hard copy of a trigger group from another FW, I can use the calipers to establish the exact difference in scale between the pictured trigger group, and the actual part. Picture #7 gives the simple math involved.

Picture #5 We can now take a measurement on the hard copy. The distance from the front surface of the front trigger to the inside surface of the front of the trigger guard bow is taken with a caliper and the measurement is converted.

Picture #6 We now have arrived at a known dimension where to place the front trigger in the guard, so we will fit and move the front trigger back to the appropriate position before laying out the exact length of pull on the stock, allowing for the thickness of our new composite butt plate.
 

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