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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know about nothing about shotguns .I have a mossburg 500 next to my bed that is all I know except it is a 20 guage. OK I want to skeet shoot . What kind of a shot gun should I get . I will not be looking for a top end gun . Could I get something for around $ 350 . I was told a 12 guage that could be chocked . I don't want to get mad and choke it I want to shoot it .Well anyway I also have concerns of how hard it will recoil my shoulder.
Do I need a 12 guage , Please give me some thoughts on it .



JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I shoot both skeet and trap! I also shoot 5 stand. Most guys use an over and under, I use a semi auto. Pump actions are ok but there a bit slow trying to get 2 birds at once but (high and low house at same time)... it can be done. Id stick with a 26'' barrel and a good set of skeet chokes. fwiw.. I seem to like #8 shot. hope that helps out somewhat. you can find a decent semi auto for your price range, id stay away from ANY and all guns in that price range for an o/u shotgun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The only difference I can tell you is .. the o/u you dont have to bend over to pick up your empty hulls, as to where the semi scatters them, and a semi has less recoil. People use both 12 and 20 with the 12 being a bit more popular. and again.. a semi auto .. the recoil is negligible... the action takes most of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I shoot trap and skeet with my Benelli Nova pump. Fantastic gun and it's right in your price range (I paid $315 OTD, but I got a 10 or 15% rebate at the time).

Of course an over-under or semi would be better, but they're going to cost you over a thousand bucks too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I shoot trap and skeet with my Benelli Nova pump. Fantastic gun and it's right in your price range (I paid $315 OTD, but I got a 10 or 15% rebate at the time).

Of course an over-under or semi would be better, but they're going to cost you over a thousand bucks too.
an o/u will def put you in the 1k range I bought my beretta silver mallard (used) for $350 and you can find some good semi autos for around the same price. my lgs has a franchi semi auto for $325 atm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I use a 930 waterfowl with a shell catcher to shoot trap. It's soft shooting on my bad shoulder, it was cheap, has an adjustable stock, and it has been 100%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Chokes are used to control the pattern of the shot. A tighter choke will hold the shot (bb's) closer together for longer. I think you will be hard pressed to find a good semi-auto for that price point and the only o/u would probably be the stoeger condor. You might want to see if you can find a good used gun instead. As far as recoil, I just returned home from 125 rounds of 12g and my shoulder is aching something fierce. But it's a good kind of pain, and there are some pigeons on that range that are turned to dust. Man is it a blast!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I use an 870 wingmaster that is 22 years old. I have won a few contest but nothing to fantastic. I have alot of fun and shoot very competitively with it. 26" barrel is a good idea. Choking is not a must unless you plan to compete with the big boys. Choking is great on an o/u because it gives you an option on shooting the close bird with one barrel and the long with the other. My 870 has a modified choke that is built into the barrel. I have had no problem filling my limit with it and it's always reliable. Another suggestion is get one that is synthetic and with hold 3" magnum shells in case you also want to duck hunt with it. I say synthetic because it is a field gun and it will be abused. Mine is wood and I worry about scratches and other damage so I plan to buy a new one soon so I can put the wingmaster back in the safe forever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I shoot a 500 in 12g for skeet and fivestand with out a problem. I have been able to shoot an average anywhere from 15-19 on a regular basis. I might jump to a semi auto when i get better scores.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've shot plenty of skeet with an 835. It works. I've hit 23 a few times (incl doubles) but never got 25.

the 500 will give you enough experience to know whether you want to put more money into it. Once you hang out a tthe range a bit, you'll be able to learn more from experienced shooters that can show you what works for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Find a used Rem 1100 or Beretta 390/391 or 3091. You will be handicapped to some degree shooting a pump for any doubles, plus you will have the versatlity to shoot sporting clays as well. A pump will do fine for singles trap, but tough to shoot doubles with a pump.. The other option is to buy a used O/U but a quality gun will still cost more than you mentioned. I will say that the SPR10 imported by Rem from Baikal is a solid O/U to start with, if you can find one for about 450. I would also definitely stick to 12 ga. for overall versatility.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My vote goes for the 870, it's what I use and use so good I see no point in upgrading anything. It feels perfect everytime I swing it up and pull it up. I could never get used to shooting a 500 worth a darn at them. I have shot the super nova at a friends once and it fealt very nice and shot well too, just looked a tad off for my taste. And I'm not sure how many rounds you plan to be shooting but my shoulder can take 1-200 rounds in a day no problEm, it's havin the darn ear plugs in that messes with me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I just started shooting trap/skeet last year and have been using a 870. I picked up a skeet and a modified choke for it ($15 each). I use the skeet for skeet and the modified for trap. I'm pretty much exclusively shooting skeet now though. Doubles are fun.

Obviously not the best setup for this type of shooting but it is plenty good enough for me to get started. If I'm still doing this in another year, I'll probably start to look for a mid-level O/U.

- Spike
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I know about nothing about shotguns .I have a mossburg 500 next to my bed that is all I know except it is a 20 guage. OK I want to skeet shoot . What kind of a shot gun should I get . I will not be looking for a top end gun . Could I get something for around $ 350 . I was told a 12 guage that could be chocked . I don't want to get mad and choke it I want to shoot it .Well anyway I also have concerns of how hard it will recoil my shoulder.
Do I need a 12 guage , Please give me some thoughts on it . JPG
As far as comparing Trap and Skeet shotguns, there are major differences between the two. Trap shotguns are designed to pattern high. The reason for this is because in Trap the targets are shot on the rise. By having the gun set up to pattern high, it gives a "built in" vertical lead necessary to hit the ascending target. If a Trap shooter waited until the target was at the apogee of it's flight, it would be too far out of range, (40 to 45 yards), to allow for consistent hits. A Trap gun allows you to stack the beads one on top of the other, and hold just under the target, firing as it ascends.

If you shoot Trap with a field gun that patterns at point of aim, you have to cover the target to acquire the necessary vertical lead. Once you do that, you have no idea where the target is. This will cause a lot of dropped targets. This effect becomes even greater when you start shooting at handicap yardages, (17 to 27 yard line). Also, Trap guns are often equipped with very high vented rib barrels to further enhance this feature depending on the shooter, and what his handicap yardage is, along with his shooting style. It is not uncommon for AA Tournament ATA Trap Shooters to run 100 straight from the 27 yard line to win top tournaments. This would be all but impossible to achieve with a field gun.

Skeet guns are almost the exact opposite. They shoot point of aim, and have shorter barrels that are choked very loosely compared to the full chokes used by Trap shooters. The general consensus is Trap is easier to learn, but much tougher to master. The reason for this is in Trap you have no idea where the bird is going to go when you call for it. In Skeet you know exactly where the bird is coming from, and where it is going to go. Once you have figured out the established leads your pretty much good to go.

Skeet is always shot from the same distance, and from the same positions. The degree of difficulty is increased by shooting a smaller gauge shotgun. In Trap it is increased by increasing the distance handicap targets are shot from. A guy running 25 straight in Skeet with a .410 is the talent equivalent of a Trap Shooter running 25 straight from the 27 yard line. Either is no easy task, and takes years to achieve, and thousands of rounds.

Trying to shoot Skeet with a Trap gun, or visa verse is like trying to deep sea fish with a Fly Rod. Fishing rods are the same as much as shotguns in that regard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
if youve never shot before.
take the 500.
If you like it, consider a used O/U in 12 or 20 gauge. what ever your most comfortable using.
+1 on this. One caveat, as long as you have the long barrel for it. I stumbled upon a great deal on two barrel combo package, 500 pump in 12 gauge. I use short for HD and three gun matches, use long for trap and skeet. I'm no expert but I regularly have good days at 20 to 22 of 25 traps with that simple 500, and my long barrel can't be choked. That is one advantage of base R870 over base M500. Anyway, have started many new Boy Scouts into trap with my 500. Not perfect but it works. 20 gauge is fine too, some people prefer it. Buy a better gun once you are sure you like the sport. You can start without chokes, just more decisions to make latter. Plus some time busting clays and actually out seeing what other folks are using will give you more info to make a gun decision latter. When out at the range, strike up conversations with the older generation trap and skeet guys - many of them have lots of experience and have great skills.

ETA - many ranges offer loaner guns when you buy the range time. Our example, Ben Avery run by AZ Game & Fish loans out R870 semiautos. $10 upgrade to nice Benallis. Check it out, great range: http://www.azgfd.gov/ctc2/index.html
 
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