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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I was growing up the most common guns you’d see in the duck marshes were Browning Auto 5s, Win M12s, Rem 870s, etc. While the 870 was a step toward low cost production with it’s alloy trigger assembly and stamped steel internals, it still had a milled steel receiver and a walnut stock. No one back in the 1960s would speak I’ll of it, they were and are good reliable pump guns.
The m12, a5, Win SX1 and others that I’m forgetting were all milled steel, even the internals. The only current repeater made of milled steel that I know of is the Ithaca m37 they make in Ohio but they are a small operation that cannot make them fast enough to meet the demand. Just try to find a new, Ohio made m37. It is one well made shotgun.
While I have nothing against the new, lightweight, alloy receiver guns I do miss seeing the oldies in use. The new stuff has choke tubes, will generally shoot a greater variety of loads, and average at least a pound lighter in weight. I still take my Old shotguns using bismuth for ducks and lead for pheasants. They feel better in hand and I seldom miss with them. Old habits die hard.
 

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I still use my mdl 12's/97's/A5's. Love these old guns.........Problem is I will wear out before they do.

2 brands that I despise are glocks and benelli's........Would not own either even if they were free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My go-to pheasant gun is a Belgium made A5, 28”, improved modified choke. My trap gun is a m12. My dove gun is a super x1. I tried a few inertia autos and do not care for them.
 

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American black walnut wood, and rust-blued steel were made for each other. Even the hardware store guns of the 50's were made up so. I have said it before, an AR15 is a $50 rifle. I would not slow down at a stop sign long enough to let somebody throw one in the back of the truck. The younger set sure love 'em though, so who is to say?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
“ I have said it before, an AR15 is a $50 rifle. I would not slow down at a stop sign long enough to let somebody throw one in the back of the truck.”

My sentiments exactly. I have zero use for that gun.
 

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ok...here you go. I mean firearms made from fine steel and beautiful wood and carefully fitted together with craftsmanship versus mass machined "bin parts", coated metal and plastic guns.

I'll take the former any day.... they have "personality" and character. Like a Ferrari versus a Corvette.
 

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A couple of years ago I attended a gun show here in the metro, and always being on the lookout for goodies like this, I spotted a fine pair of 12 gauge Damascus barrels on a vendor's bench. I hung around a while till I got a chance to ask about them, then the vendor tells me they are not for sale, they go with this other gun. He pulls a .577 Black Powder British express hammer double rifle off his rack, and lays it beside the barrels, and of course everything is a perfect match. I didn't even bother to ask him the price, the gun was way out of my price range. I only think about the thing once every few weeks now though, I am getting better. Figured English walnut and rust blued steel, tastefully engraved and done up before 1900--they take my breath away a little.
 

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I'm 74 and shoot a matched pair 12 and 20 gauge Winchester 1200 Skeet grades, a Winchester Model 101 single barrel Trap grade that was made somewhere in the 80's near as I can figger and an SKB Model 600 fitted with 28 and 20 gauge barrels. Only a guess but likely made somewhere in the 70's / early 80's. I've had podium finishes with all of them and wouldn't trade or sell any of them for a shelf full of anything synthetic. I could go on but in this forum I don't think I need to say any more.
 

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NFG, LL here,
I also really admire the way the older weapons were handcrafted. Flintlock, Percussion, Side by side, over under, Bolt and the Semi's. My old Mossberg 500 pump has been in the family 3 generations now, I completely restored it 8 or 9 years ago. I did not touch the wood except to buff it up a little, Too many little family history marks. Due to a left shoulder replacement, I can't rack the Mossy as quickly as I would like to anymore. She's in the safe taking it easy now.

I just recieved my new in the box Tristar KRX FDE 12 Ga Semi, it has it's Pro's and Con's. I do like the Mags, the lightweight and how quickly it comes on target and handles. It does not bother either shoulder to fire boxes of rounds.
The fit and finish on the outside is well done, the internals on the other hand, left a lot to be desired ! When I first got it I pulled it all apart for an inspection and boy I'm mighty glad I did !

I found lot of little metal bits, plastic extrusions not filed even on the mag followers. The firing pin locking pin had a bur from drilling stuck at the bottom of the hole and the pin did not sit flush, Mighty glad I l looked before I shot the weapon ! I spent the time to QC the entire weapon, down to every last part. Yes it was a disappointment at first, but after taking the time to clean up the mags and internals, now the fit and function is good to go.

I have not had as much fun from shooting the KRX since I was a kid chasing rabbits with my old iver Johnson. I guess in our " gotta have it last week " world, Issues like this are becoming more and more common. I'm glad I learned from the Old Guard how to tinker and make things work !

JMHO
LL
 

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its all i shoot. i wont own a plastic gun.
 
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I recently went through a period of wanting a 20 gauge semi auto, but did not want an alloy receiver. Well, with the exception of the 1100 & 11-87s that recently went out of production, the only other steel receiver 20 gauges to buy would be the 1970s-1980s Browning B2000 and a few of the earlier Browning B80s. All the rest have alloy receivers. I bought a B2000 in 20 gauge and it is exactly what I wanted with beautiful blued steel and walnut. It incorporates detailed machining and is carefully made for a production gun.

It is also has an IC fixed choke, which is perfect for my use with a 20 gauge. Blued steel, walnut and fixed chokes; what was I thinking? I am sure some will think there is no way I will be able to shoot anything with that archaic combination! We'll see about that! ;)
 

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When I was growing up the most common guns you’d see in the duck marshes were Browning Auto 5s, Win M12s, Rem 870s, etc. While the 870 was a step toward low cost production with it’s alloy trigger assembly and stamped steel internals, it still had a milled steel receiver and a walnut stock. No one back in the 1960s would speak I’ll of it, they were and are good reliable pump guns.
The m12, a5, Win SX1 and others that I’m forgetting were all milled steel, even the internals. The only current repeater made of milled steel that I know of is the Ithaca m37 they make in Ohio but they are a small operation that cannot make them fast enough to meet the demand. Just try to find a new, Ohio made m37. It is one well made shotgun.
While I have nothing against the new, lightweight, alloy receiver guns I do miss seeing the oldies in use. The new stuff has choke tubes, will generally shoot a greater variety of loads, and average at least a pound lighter in weight. I still take my Old shotguns using bismuth for ducks and lead for pheasants. They feel better in hand and I seldom miss with them. Old habits die hard.
The new repeaters and even break open guns are generally capable, inexpensive, "rooster guns," Guns you don't mind hopping a barb wire fence with, not inexpensive, but still reliable and accurate. Built affordable and for the average shooter. They're what we called "hardware store" guns in my day. The modern equivalent lacks the reliability, but they're tough and inexpensive and help keep the sport alive by allowing the budget shooter to participate. Us "seasoned" shooters would rather spend on the "ol' reliables" and let those whippersnappers have at the new guns. But as they "season", they'll be looking at milled steel, history and romance. They'll come around, they are working hard, raising kids and nice guns are right around the corner for them.
 

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The nicest thing that can be said about the new plastic and camo finished shotguns is the fact that the classic shotguns are being traded in for them at an unprecedented rate. Our local pawn shops here are chock full of wood and steel classics at prices that they simply could not be built for in this day and age. I think the younger set are inheriting them, and running down to the store to get ahold of something more modern. With our new fearless leader at the helm, everything firearm is moving, but the deals are still out there to be had. With the exception of owning something to shoot steel shot through, I will stick with the tried and true.
 

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If I start to miss'm any, then I get'm out and shoot'em.
 

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^^^^^^^^
Exactly...
 
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