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Hello from the Mighty Midwest!

Years ago I stumbled upon this 1941 Browning Auto-5 12-gauge with
adjustable Poly Choke.

She's a shooter and a bone crusher for sure!!!

Just thought I'd stop in and see if there are any other A5 luvs here...馃槑

FWIW....the "new" A5 is a short stroke whimp!
 

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I have 2. A 12 and a 20. I hunt with both. I DON"T LIKE inertia shotguns so I'll never own one. Inertia is the current fad even though it was invented in 1908.........Took it awhile to catch on...........
 

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Hello from SW Idaho. In the late '70's the Old Man brought home a Remington Model 11. That one had a full length full choked barrel and weighed something over 8 lbs. I was a skinny high schooler at the time, but I began hunting with it anyway. I shot it as well as any shotgun we owned for about a half a day, then it would get too heavy for me and I would start shooting behind everything. I never was flush enough to buy a Browning in those times; later on I dealt on a couple of them, but never landed one. Finally in the 2000's I scored a Savage 720 in a project gun condition at a good price, so I set about rebuilding it the way I wanted MY auto 5. I traded for a Revelation 400 barrel and bolt to get the double extractors, and I put in an older Remington Model 11 trigger group to get the sliding safety forward of the trigger. I will copy all the lightening machining cuts made on the Browning Lwt. All works well together so far, but the mainsping housing tube is busted inside the stock. That part I will make. I purchased a real live Savage Super Choke on a cut barrel end to install. Finally I would like to build up a light and strong wooden framework for the stocks and try to veneer them with impossibly figured burl walnut. At some point when my current shotgun project is finished I will tackle it.
I thought long and hard about beginning with an aluminum receiver such as the Savage 745, the Savage 750, or the Browning Ultralight. In the end I abandoned that idea. Those receivers lack durability, and once they wear and get scratched a bit, they look just awful.
 

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welcome. pogo stick owners...unite!
 

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Hello from SW Idaho. In the late '70's the Old Man brought home a Remington Model 11. That one had a full length full choked barrel and weighed something over 8 lbs. I was a skinny high schooler at the time, but I began hunting with it anyway. I shot it as well as any shotgun we owned for about a half a day, then it would get too heavy for me and I would start shooting behind everything. I never was flush enough to buy a Browning in those times; later on I dealt on a couple of them, but never landed one. Finally in the 2000's I scored a Savage 720 in a project gun condition at a good price, so I set about rebuilding it the way I wanted MY auto 5. I traded for a Revelation 400 barrel and bolt to get the double extractors, and I put in an older Remington Model 11 trigger group to get the sliding safety forward of the trigger. I will copy all the lightening machining cuts made on the Browning Lwt. All works well together so far, but the mainsping housing tube is busted inside the stock. That part I will make. I purchased a real live Savage Super Choke on a cut barrel end to install. Finally I would like to build up a light and strong wooden framework for the stocks and try to veneer them with impossibly figured burl walnut. At some point when my current shotgun project is finished I will tackle it.
I thought long and hard about beginning with an aluminum receiver such as the Savage 745, the Savage 750, or the Browning Ultralight. In the end I abandoned that idea. Those receivers lack durability, and once they wear and get scratched a bit, they look just awful.
Sure would like to see that one when it is finished!

BTW, my experience with the Long Recoil Browning design is that it is not a "bone crusher" if it has fresh springs that are not compressed and is set-up/lubed appropriately for the ammo being used. In fact, I find them to be very soft shooting once you learn their best practices.
 

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I have not riffled through the Savage 720 project box for awhile now, but it is on deck. Right now I am very strong into the double barrels, and from all appearances that is the direction my shop is going to go. I do not dare to get too distracted at this point, so all the other vintage rifle and shotgun projects are on hold for now pending retirement and getting the beginnings of my working shop up and running. The veneering of a stock is an idea that has stayed with me for a number of years, and there is nothing for it but to have a go trying it. I spent several years as a machinist in the plastic industry, and the vacuum table was our go-to work-holding device for that slippery stuff. By plumbing the hollow stock itself to a small improvised vacuum pump and using that to hold the veneer tight to the stock and in place I believe the material could be sliced and thin strips applied and accurately jointed--but again, it is just a theory. As near as I can tell online no one is attempting or has attempted it.
 

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That would be really cool if it could be made to work! The possibilities would almost be endless on types of wood that could be applied as veneer. Interested to see if anything tangible results from your trials.
 

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I have 2, a light 12 from 1965, and a 16 from 1929.
Have re-sprung and thoroughly cleaned/buffed the inner workings plus lubed according to current directions and it shoots amazing, not a body beater at all.
The 16 took its maiden voyage with me yesterday, it worked well, but definitely needs the same attention I gave the 12.
These are both new to me, but will become my users until others join the ranks...

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

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I love the Auto 5. 50 years ago, dad took me to Williams Gun Sight do buy my first shotgun. It was between the A5 light 20, and the Beretta BL3 20 ga over and under .

Back then, Williams would let you shoot the guns before buying . I hit 5/5 with the A5 and 3/5 with the beretta . I ended up buying the beretta cause it was a pound lighter, chambered for 3鈥 shells, and I wanted to be like dad and have an O/U.

I often regret not getting the A5.
 

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I love the Auto 5. 50 years ago, dad took me to Williams Gun Sight do buy my first shotgun. It was between the A5 light 20, and the Beretta BL3 20 ga over and under .

Back then, Williams would let you shoot the guns before buying . I hit 5/5 with the A5 and 3/5 with the beretta . I ended up buying the beretta cause it was a pound lighter, chambered for 3鈥 shells, and I wanted to be like dad and have an O/U.

I often regret not getting the A5.
No time like the present, plus no more regrets

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 
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