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In picking a 20 over a 12 gauge that much of a disadvantage. A couple of birds ? It would be lighter and faster to get on target plus a little easier to carry afield even with 30 inch tubes.
 

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The better the shotgun shot you are, the lesser will be the impact of going to a smaller gauge. Range and pattern density stay roughly the same. The size of the pattern is reduced as the gauge gets smaller. A lighter gauge shotgun is sometimes lighter and faster to get on the bird with, but you have to hold tighter on target with a 20 than you do with a 12 simply because there is less room for error with the smaller pattern. One of my favorite upland game pump guns is a Model 17 Remington in 20 gauge. When I do my part she always comes through.
 

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I never use a 12 gauge on Sporting Clays, only a 20 or a 410 or both.

I've shot a lot of trap with both 12 Gauge and 20 Gauge and always figured there was about a 2 bird per 100 difference, so maybe I'd shoot a 97 with a 20 Gauge and a 99 with a 12 Gauge.

The same is probably true on Sporting Clays also.

And, a lot of the guys are shooting 7/8 oz or 1 oz. in their 12 Gauges on Sporting Clays so I wouldn't think it makes them miss too many.
 

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Incidentally, this is where the 16 gauge begins to shine. The good old steel framed shotguns like the Model 12, Remington 31 and 870, Remington 11, Savage 720, 30, 520 and the Browning Auto 5, to name a few, in the 12 gauges are getting heavy for me in my advanced maturity. My pumping arm has some nerve damage these days, I notice it whenever I attempt to put on a tie for church (rarely, fortunately). The Remington 17 20 gauge really comes into its own, and the 16 gauge Model 12 is also a much sleeker gun. Seems these days I have trouble getting the old 12 gauge Model 12 moving, and I have trouble getting it stopped. Unfortunately my experience with the 16 is limited to just a few models, but I know a good thing when I see one.
 

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I shot NSSA competition skeet for 20 years, and used the 20ga for the 12ga, 20ga, and doubles events after the first two years. My 20ga average was over 1 bird better than my 12ga average so it worked well.
I do occasionally shoot a 12ga at sporting, but I use 3/4oz loads in it. I just hate to see that nice Krieghoff Model 32 wasting away in the safe:love:
 

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Incidentally, this is where the 16 gauge begins to shine. The good old steel framed shotguns like the Model 12, Remington 31 and 870, Remington 11, Savage 720, 30, 520 and the Browning Auto 5, to name a few, in the 12 gauges are getting heavy for me in my advanced maturity. My pumping arm has some nerve damage these days, I notice it whenever I attempt to put on a tie for church (rarely, fortunately). The Remington 17 20 gauge really comes into its own, and the 16 gauge Model 12 is also a much sleeker gun. Seems these days I have trouble getting the old 12 gauge Model 12 moving, and I have trouble getting it stopped. Unfortunately my experience with the 16 is limited to just a few models, but I know a good thing when I see one.
I like that terminology. I was recently at the dermatologist to have a check on all my moles and she burned off a couple of what she called, "maturity marks". I asked her if she meant age spots. and she said it was the same! :oops: :LOL:
 

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I recently picked up a Browning CXS in 20 gauge with 30 inch barrels, in sporting clay I think I broke 40 once with my 12 gauge Browning Maxus, first time out with this and I shot 43. I do sporting clay maybe three times a year usually right before the hunting season starts.
 

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You will notice a difference in your scores when you switch to .22LR birdshot :) a .410 is pretty risky on quartering down canyon flyers aka diving quail . Of ALL the targets in sporting clays which makes me nervous it's those especially with tricky wind winding through a canyon such as Kern County Gun Club as well as Moore N Moore . An those of us whom shoot know clay courses vary greatly from club to club .
 

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In the Sporting Clays world, if you are seriously competing, it is very much a 12ga game. One target will usually separate the winners from us contributors. If you are shooting with your buds to have a great time, as I do, just do it and have a great time.
 

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You will notice a difference in your scores when you switch to .22LR birdshot :) a .410 is pretty risky on quartering down canyon flyers aka diving quail . Of ALL the targets in sporting clays which makes me nervous it's those especially with tricky wind winding through a canyon such as Kern County Gun Club as well as Moore N Moore . An those of us whom shoot know clay courses vary greatly from club to club .
Never shot at Kern, but Moore-N-Moore is my course of choice.
We should meet up one of these days!
 
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