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Tricks or techniques that increased...

This is a discussion on Tricks or techniques that increased... within the Sporting Clays forums, part of the Shotgun Shooters Forum category; There are no tricks. This game is 95% mental and absolute focus on a small part of each and every target is the heart and ...



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Old 03-08-2017, 05:55 PM   #21
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There are no tricks. This game is 95% mental and absolute focus on a small part of each and every target is the heart and soul of the game. It takes work to get to the point where you have no thoughts in your head whatsoever and the focus required to achieve consistency.
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Old 04-11-2018, 02:14 AM   #22
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Seriously, 85% of your average shoots targets should be hittable by everyone - including new shooters like yourself. Learn those and MASTER them; by that I mean don't settle for 4/8 at a station. You get yourself to the point where you're running those stations and then begin to focus on those few separator stations. A good coach/teacher can shorten the learning curve time.
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Old 04-11-2018, 06:40 AM   #23
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trigger time red, trigger time.
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Old 05-09-2018, 06:05 AM   #24
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This was a terrific thread and should be read by many. Why? The folks here have let us see how they think. Watching the better shooters on the platform, an invaluable resource. Training the mind to focus, as in many disciplines a central thought. " Clear the mechanism. " as Kevin Costner? does in the baseball movie. Even my friend bobski owns up to being a terrific fellow and not the anvil all the time. Only sending out love my brother don't pick up the hammer. " As a man thinketh, so is he. "
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Old 05-09-2018, 06:58 AM   #25
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talking skeet...

I had the 2017 san ant' world champion 410 hoa winner come to my range to practice before he left for the 2018 masters in savanna 2 weeks ago.
he brought a pacer.
(a friend to shoot with)
he wanted trigger time.
great.
but his pacer was a lousy shot.
he got caught up trying to help his buddy....and sure enough, he started missing.
4 lows were kicking his tail. then 6 lows.
an obvious pattern.
I was sitting at the club watching...and he turned back to me and said, I have no clue!

I got up, stood behind him, watched, told him he was behind 6". that's all it took.
even great shooters sometimes need someone to tell them whats going on.
next day, he came back and started missing again.
I got up, stood behind him...didn't say a word....and he started hitting them.

secret?

PRESSURE.

knowing he was being watched, snapped him back into concentrating.

when he was done, I told him, if you don't come out here to practice as if youre at the world on center court....youre wasting your time.
he agreed.

review.

1. shoot with someone better than you.
2. determine the loss for poor performance. if you have nothing to lose, youll shoot as if you have nothing to lose.
3. knowing your talent, set realistic goals for every practice. aim for it. then review your results and make the needed corrections.
4. don't blame the gun or ammo.
5. the nut behind the bolt breaks birds.
6. clay games are games of recall of the sight pictures. if you forget them, you wont recall what to do.
7. trigger time on all the sight pictures improves recall.

good luck.


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Old 05-09-2018, 02:03 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by SamuelKing77 View Post
Seriously, 85% of your average shoots targets should be hittable by everyone - including new shooters like yourself. Learn those and MASTER them; by that I mean don't settle for 4/8 at a station. You get yourself to the point where you're running those stations and then begin to focus on those few separator stations. A good coach/teacher can shorten the learning curve time.
If that's true, then why is a winning score usually around 92 or 93 by the higher classification shooters and the average of all shooters around 74 or so?
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:09 AM   #27
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Meat.

I'm guessing the 74's would quickly become 90's if their dinner depended on it.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:32 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by bobski View Post
talking skeet...

I had the 2017 san ant' world champion 410 hoa winner come to my range to practice before he left for the 2018 masters in savanna 2 weeks ago.
he brought a pacer.
(a friend to shoot with)
he wanted trigger time.
great.
but his pacer was a lousy shot.
he got caught up trying to help his buddy....and sure enough, he started missing.
4 lows were kicking his tail. then 6 lows.
an obvious pattern.
I was sitting at the club watching...and he turned back to me and said, I have no clue!

I got up, stood behind him, watched, told him he was behind 6". that's all it took.
even great shooters sometimes need someone to tell them whats going on.
next day, he came back and started missing again.
I got up, stood behind him...didn't say a word....and he started hitting them.

secret?

PRESSURE.

knowing he was being watched, snapped him back into concentrating.

when he was done, I told him, if you don't come out here to practice as if youre at the world on center court....youre wasting your time.
he agreed.

review.

1. shoot with someone better than you.
2. determine the loss for poor performance. if you have nothing to lose, youll shoot as if you have nothing to lose.
3. knowing your talent, set realistic goals for every practice. aim for it. then review your results and make the needed corrections.
4. don't blame the gun or ammo.
5. the nut behind the bolt breaks birds.
6. clay games are games of recall of the sight pictures. if you forget them, you wont recall what to do.
7. trigger time on all the sight pictures improves recall.

good luck.


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I found the "review" portion of your post most enlightening.
I have found that when I am shooting with those that are better I shoot better. However there is one trap I fell into and that was to try to mimic what works for them instead of shooting my own game. Example: While shooting with some guys that were breaking targets just as they cleared the house I found myself shooting too quickly and missing. One of them then told me to shoot my own game and not to shoot his. I did this and got back on track
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Old 05-11-2018, 11:13 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Flash View Post
If that's true, then why is a winning score usually around 92 or 93 by the higher classification shooters and the average of all shooters around 74 or so?

SHOULD be hittable and clearing the station are two different things. Where I shoot in Florida, most courses are 14-16 stations, typically with 2 separator stations. The other stations are easily runnable by a good A, AA, or M class shooter. The issue becomes that most do not have the mental discipline to take each and every target and treat it like a mini one target championship. We start to rush ( or slow down); start thinking about "I got this station run", lose focus, lose concentration, or just get sloppy. The result seems to be something like XX,XX,XX,00. If you drop only 1 bird at each station on a 16 station course, you're maxing out at 84, but if you clean those 12 stations and only drop 1-2 on those two separator stations, you're HOA.
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Old 05-11-2018, 03:03 PM   #30
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Very true. Should be hittable is something I hear frequently but don't see very often.
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